6.8 SPC Ballistics Charts for Major Ammo Manufacturers

Doubletap Ammunition Ballistics - 6.8 SPC

Doubletap 6.8 SPC 90 grain Bonded JSP Ballistics Chart

Doubletap 6.8 SPC 90 grain Bonded JSP Ballistics table

Doubletap 6.8 SPC 95 grain Lead TTSX Ballistics Chart

Doubletap 6.8 SPC 95 grain Lead TTSX Ballistics table

Doubletap 6.8 SPC 100 grain Accubond Ballistics Chart

Doubletap 6.8 SPC 100 grain Accubond Ballistics table

Doubletap 6.8 SPC 110 grain Rifle Defense Ballistics Chart

Doubletap 6.8 SPC 110 grain Rifle Defense Ballistics table

Doubletap 6.8 SPC 115 grain Match FMJBT Ballistics Chart

Doubletap 6.8 SPC 115 grain Match FMJBT Ballistics table

Hornady Ammunition Ballistics - 6.8 SPC

Hornady Black 6.8 SPC 100 grain V-MAX Ballistics Chart

Hornady Black 6.8 SPC 100 grain V-MAX Ballistics table

Hornady Custom 6.8 SPC 100 grain CX Ballistics Chart

Hornady Custom 6.8 SPC 100 grain CX Ballistics table

Hornady Custom 6.8 SPC 120 grain SST Ballistics Chart

Hornady Custom 6.8 SPC 120 grain SST Ballistics table

HSM Ammunition Ballistics - 6.8 SPC

HSM Match 6.8 SPC 115 grain MatchKing Ballistics Chart

HSM Match 6.8 SPC 115 grain MatchKing Ballistics table

Nosler Ammunition Ballistics - 6.8 SPC

Nosler Match Grade 6.8 SPC 115 grain Custom Competition Ballistics Chart

Nosler Match Grade 6.8 SPC 115 grain Custom Competition Ballistics table

S&B Ammunition Ballistics - 6.8 SPC

Sellier & Bellot 6.8 SPC 110 grain FMJ Ballistics Chart

Sellier & Bellot 6.8 SPC 110 grain FMJ Ballistics table

Sellier & Bellot 6.8 SPC 115 grain HPBT Ballistics Chart

Sellier & Bellot 6.8 SPC 115 grain HPBT Ballistics table

Sellier & Bellot 6.8 SPC 115 grain PTS Ballistics Chart

Sellier & Bellot 6.8 SPC 115 grain PTS Ballistics table

Underwood Ammunition Ballistics - 6.8 SPC

Underwood Ammo 6.8 SPC 110 grain V-MAX Ballistics Chart

Underwood Ammo 6.8 SPC 110 grain V-MAX Ballistics table

Winchester Ammunition Ballistics - 6.8 SPC

Winchester Deer Season XP 6.8 SPC 115 grain Extreme Point Ballistics Chart

Winchester Deer Season XP 6.8 SPC 115 grain Extreme Point Ballistics table

Winchester USA Ready 6.8 SPC 115 grain Open Tip Ballistics Chart

Winchester USA Ready 6.8 SPC 115 grain Open Tip Ballistics table

6.8 SPC Trajectory Chart

The trajectory measures a bullet’s flight to its target based on bullet drop (in inches). Below, you’ll find an 6.8 SPC bullet drop chart that gives you a general idea of the 6.8 SPC trajectory.

6.8 SPC Trajectory Chart

Note: The chart above is an example of one 6.8 SPC load, and actual ballistic performance may vary depending on bullet weight, lot, barrel length, and environmental conditions while shooting.

How Does 6.8 SPC Ballistics Compare to Other Rifles?

The 6.8 SPC was designed to increase the lethality of the 5.56 NATO/.223 Rem in the AR-15 platform. Unfortunately, the new cartridge didn’t perform quite as well as other options in short-barrel rifles and at long-range distances for the U.S. Army.

Nonetheless, it’s a great hunting cartridge, and we often compare it to the 6.5 Grendel. Both cartridges have similar specs, like case length and the same overall length. The 6.8 SPC shoots a wider projectile, while the 6.5 Grendel is more sleek and aerodynamic.

The 6.8 SPC loses muzzle energy quickly, so the effective range is only about 300 yards. On the other hand, the 6.5 Grendel will effectively travel much further (it typically has a higher ballistic coefficient and muzzle velocity). Still, both have excellent terminal performance, making them a great choice for varmint hunting and for medium-sized game animals like whitetail deer and hogs.

Another popular rifle cartridge is the 300 Blackout. Similar to the 6.8, this cartridge performs well in the AR platform and is perfectly adequate for self-defense and deer hunting. While trajectory varies depending on ammunition (bullet weight, design, etc.), the Hornady V-max has less bullet drop in the 6.8 SPC vs. the 300 Blackout (110-grain bullets). Each has excellent stopping power, but the 6.8 SPC performs a little better at longer ranges.

Why the 6.8 SPC Isn’t As Popular As Other Rifle Calibers

6.8 SPC ammo for sale

The 6.8 SPC came on the scene in 2004 as a joint effort between Remington and the U.S. Army Marksmanship Unit to introduce a new cartridge with more lethality than the 5.56 NATO/.223 Rem for the M4 carbine.

The 30 Remington was used for a parent case and modified to fire a 6.8mm or 0.277” diameter bullet.

Sadly, the Remington SPC had a rough start, Remington botched the chamber design, causing full-power 6.8 SPC loads to be slightly over chamber pressure specs. Instead of fixing the chamber design, Remington underloaded their ammo for the military trials.

Special Operations Command was unimpressed with the lower power loads, and the 6.8 SPC was not adopted by the US Army.

Remington eventually rectified the chamber issues by submitting the 6.8 SPC II rifle cartridge for standardization to SAAMI. But it was far too late, and the U.S. military chose the .277 Sig Fury as its NGSW (New Generation Squad Weapon).

Despite initial hiccups, the 6.8 SPC has excellent terminal ballistics and performs well at longer ranges and close quarters.

6.8 SPC ammo isn’t as readily available as other popular .30 caliber options or the 6.5 Creedmoor, and it’s a bit more expensive. So, reloading is a great benefit for those choosing the 6.8 SPC rifle. However, the terminal ballistics and overall ballistic performance are quite adequate for most civilian shooters.

Finally, the 6.8 SPC is available in a variety of rifles (Savage, Remington, Ruger, LWRC, etc.). But there are several other options available that shooters love, like the 300 AAC Blackout, 6.5 Grendel, and 6.5 Creedmoor.

FAQs

Many civilian shooters are looking for alternatives to the .223 Remington for its hunting capabilities in rifles with shorter barrels and AR-15 rifles. If you still have questions about 6.8 SPC cartridges or rifles, keep reading.

AR-15 rifle

What is the maximum range of the 6.8 SPC?

The maximum effective range of the 6.8 SPC varies depending on the ammunition and rifle (barrel length, grain weight, etc.). But the 6.8 SPC loses too much energy after 200 to 300 yards to be effective.

How does 6.8 compare to 308 Winchester?

The .308 Winchester will shoot much further than the 6.8 SPC. However, the 6.8 SPC is better for close-quarter shots and has less recoil.

Is a 6.8 SPC good for deer hunting?

Absolutely! 6.8 SPC cartridges have plenty of stopping power for hunting deer within 200-300 yards.

What is the velocity of a 6.8 SPC?

The muzzle velocity and muzzle energy depend on the bullet, but we typically see somewhere between 2,400-2,900 fps velocity and 1,500-1,800 ft-lbs energy.

6.8 SPC Ballistics Charts for Major Ammo Manufacturers originally appeared on Ammo.com

5 Likes

Not just a great Deer cartridge, the 6.8 SPC has also become a favorite hog killer because it combines lethality with faster follow ups.

BTW it wasn’t just the Remington chamber that was a problem, the civilian SPC l & II sport barrels were being rifled out of SAMMI spec. Harrison Beene at AR15 Performance figured out the best (3r, 5r) groove/land ratio, twist and throat length for the 90-120 gtain bullets. ARP barrels typically get increases of 100-200 fps depending on barrel length over other SPCll. Even Elk have been taken out to 400 with 20" barrels.

Because the 6.8 SPCll has less of a energy penalty out of shorter barrels no 5.56, or 6.5 that I am aware of has a better terminal range out of a 12.5 -14.5 AR15 of a equal ARP 6.8 SPC.

6 Likes

Looks like from energy it is not much more than a 200 yard Deer round with most bullets. Out to 200 it seems ok any further and shot placement will need to be spot on. I think the 6 ARC may be the way to go, I think the support for it will get way better, I can’t say I have ever seen 6.8 ammo on the shelf, I have 6 ARC, but anyway…

5 Likes

Most manufacturers load down for the SPC l. Because of that most non reloaders use Druid Hill or Ubderwood to reach out there. For reloaders it is a solid 400 yard cartridge using the right projectiles. I see it rarely at the LGS and we feed ours from the internet,using S&B for their supierior brass. Their PTS is good on Deer to 300 at our elevation.

I like 6mms in general and thought the AR15 should have been one originally. I like the ARC too, with it’s lower pressure it’s not so over bore as most 6mms. Like the 6.8 SPC it can be loaded up, but the bolt is lacking in meat so its a bit more suseptible to breaking. Interestingly the ARC is identical to the 6mm Predator designed by Harrison Beene at AR15 Performance. Hornady was making the dies for him, and they even bought a barrel from him before coming out with the ARC which by chance had a shoulder bump tweak to be able to claim it was “theirs”. The 400 Legend uses the 6.8 SPC bolt for the exctra strength but then they lowered the pressure into the pussy zone :roll_eyes:. With that stronger bolt I wonder what could be wildcatted with it though.

The ARC is likely one of the best long range AR15 cartridges out there. The 6.8 is one of the best hunting AR15 cartridges IMO. It seems to be in a sweet spot of bullet size, weight, and speed for deer and hogs at regular hunting distances. With enough practice and the right ammo, it definately works to 400 yards, but like almost every other cartridge used for hunting it’s mostly used at 300 and under.

8 Likes

I invested heavily in this cartridge in 2005 and 06 really hoping to get more out to 500. I still have a 16" AR in it and in TX there seems to be quite a few pig hunters using it. That is why I kept mine.

7 Likes

Yep the 6.8 definately isn’t a 500 yard slayer.

It’s magic is in closer. It will definitely ring the steel real good out to 500-600. The ARC really is a better longer range shooter. If I was hunting out to past those distances I would pick a 6.8 Western. The 308 is solid to 600, I just want a 6.8 Western.

5 Likes