Back ground checks


#1

What can you support in the way of expanded back ground checks? I would think that they should include juvenile records and the number of times you have been contacted by law enforcement.


#2

You do realize this is a huge can of worms you’re opening? Anyway, without going too far down the rabbit hole too much I can tell you that expanding background checks is utterly useless and inefficient because there are numerous ways to circumvent them: the black market aka illicit gun trade, the corrupt circuit (bad LE/MIL personnel), gun shows and private transfers. No law actually prevents fire arm related crime. So no, I do not support more gun control measures. We don’t need 'em anyway because all it takes to stop a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun. The 2nd Amendment is all about sheep dog mentality, that’s what the anti gunners fail to grasp.


#3

Background checks have proven to be a government failure, time and time again. The latest incidents are good examples of laws that impact the law abiding, but have zero effect on criminal behavior.

In addition, the federal government has shown to be completely unwilling to enforce the laws already on the books, except selectively. The Air Force and the FBI and on the local level, the police and school system failures allowed people who should not have had access to firearms to get them. Who will be held accountable for these failures, likely no one, as that is how government rolls. No one will be disciplined of fired for the deaths that resulted from their incompetence.

More laws will not make the federal government more efficient or cause it to obey and enforce its own laws.

Around 80,000 people were denied a firearm in 2012 (under Obama) due to a failed background check, only 44 were prosecuted by the federal government. Please tell me how more laws will force the federal government to prosecute and jail these criminals. What is the point of having millions of people submit to background checks when the criminals who try and fail to obtain a gun are not sent to jail. Note: It is likely that the vast majority of these 80,000+ people were wrongly denied and later approved, because they had a name similar to a criminal or a traffic warrant etc. I myself was delayed for 3 days because I was fingerprinted for a security clearance and all the system saw was that the FBI had reviewed my fingerprints. That being said, I would be the 44 who were prosecuted were facing other charges and the gun charge was simply an add-on to increase their sentences.

Background checks are a sad, sad joke, that doesn’t prevent criminals from getting guns or put more criminals behind bars. This is a great example of a response to the cry, “We have to DO Something!!!”, which turns into feel good fluff and nothing more.


#4

It is not that I think we should


#5

It s not that I think we should but they are going to do something. So we should be prepared to try and make it the best we can.And you are right faceless buracrats are only going to do the bare minimum and only if


#6

A person can be contacted by law enforcement for any number of reasons, many of which have nothing to do with the person being contacted directly. Including mere contacts would be assuming guilt by innuendo without due process.
The Florida shooter could have been stopped if numerous authorities in several agencies had simply done what they were hired to do. Instead, many were simply too busy to pay attention and gave these reports of his impending attacks short shrift.
District attorneys and courts often chose to not enforce gun laws, a proven fact that haunts Chicago and other high crime places. Social service agencies often fail to follow up for one reason or another. Police officers often fail to act on or pass on reports of dangerous folks. All of these things and more happened in this case.
The system, which I agree could be improved, was not at fault at all in this mass shooting. The adults in this young man’s life and those in positions of authority who could have stopped him did not. They failed. That is the truth.


#7

Data sharing might help, but in order for them to actually work there would need to be some means of enforcing them for private sales. Law enforcement can’t even enforce the laws we have now.


#8

The notion has been brought up to push the legal age for gun purchases to 21 instead of 18, which I think may have something positive…however, not just for firearms. Why can an 18yo enlist in the military or sign themselves up for credit cards or student loans but not have a beer? I think that if this is going to take place, then it needs to be across the board. In this day and age, kids are more immature than ever, imo (as the father of a teenager) so I think there could be some merit to pushing the age of consent up to 21, but expanding background checks? I would echo others who have said that the various agencies and departments need to communicate more to better equip them to perform the background checks we have NOW.


#9

I’m not going to entertain the idea. I started teaching my kids gun safety before they were in their teens with a .22lr. Great way to have a good time with your kids and teach them about respect, safety, and that I trust them to do the right thing. Seems to me we need a law making it mandatory that parents take training classes on how to raise a child, mandatory that parents take responsibility for their children, mandatory that parents spend time with their children, mandatory that parents are actually parents. Otherwise you are going the wrong way.


#10

I spent Sat. At a gun show talking to several people and they all feel that the Sheriff in that county failed to do what he was hired to do.I have also had conversation s with local teachers and am married to a teacher and almost all of them would carry if they could get the training.And today’s parents have abandoned their responsibly to raise their own children they expect the grandparents or the state to do it for them .I know It is not all of them but we see too many in this area that are in and out of prison and drug rehab. And they don’t see or care about the damage it does ti the kids.


#11

I’m against raising the age limit to 21 for all firearms purchases.

At age 18 you are an adult with the right to vote. But … you’ll be stripped of your right to defend yourself for 3 years without due process?

Frankly if someone isn’t mentally capable of handling a firearm at age 18, how are they mentally capable of voting too? It’s the “pick-and-choose” mentality of the left. They want to keep adult teens as babies… unless they can count on those teens to vote for them.


#12

No. I think that the background checks we have are already enough. Background checks mean nothing to the violent crime rate.


#13

No more gun laws period, end of discussion.


#14

There is nothing that can prevent this from occurring again. It is the age in which we live. It is that simple and no one wants to hear it. Firearms did not create defective children, bad parents, crushing poverty, drug addiction, homelessness, and corrupt, lazy, and incompetent governments. Firearms protect us from these evils. Not good enough some say. We are going after your right to defend yourself from these evils by trampling on the second amendment and due process. Why? Because it’s easy.


#15

No where in the 2nd Amendment do I see anything about background checks or any restrictions of any kind…you just have to shake your head when some zombie say’s they support the 2nd Amendment, BUT they are ok with more gun law’s and restrictions…I know that those same zombies have never looked what the word ( infringed ) means…


#16

You forgot Islamic terrorists…


#17

Regardless of the future age of when someone can legally purchase a gun, I’m still going to continue to shoot them with my daughters (20 and 16) and all of my nieces and nephews (all of whom are 17 and under). It’s about safety and common sense.

The tools that teachers and schools need to properly discipline kids and have a respectful setting in their classrooms have been completely removed by many parents who fail to use those tools themselves. If we can improve the physical security of our schools and get those tools back in the hands of teachers who need them I think we’ll be better off in the long run.


#18

Absolutely spot on. We have infantalized our children and look where they are They have increased difficulty securing and keeping a job, they have high rates of alcoholiism and drug addiction, they have a high rate of failed marriages, depression, and violence and then they wind up moving in with their aging, stupid parents. Good job everybody. Now, our right to defend ourselves against these cretins is under attack.


#19

Does anybody remember when we got a drink from the garden hose. … picked apples and took stuff out of the garden for a snack…and oh my gosh we didn’t even wash it off? I never even heard of anybody not knowing what bathroom to use ever before two years ago. We made our fun and know where our food comes from and most of us know how to grow it. People that are trying to take our rights away very seldom have normal everyday experiences to fall back on .most of them protest and don’t even know why. This is our future. We need to stand up for the 2nd amendment because this protects all the other freedoms we have in the Constitution.


#20

You are right I can still do all those things.But as people become more urban they forget those skills. Growing up we farmed and hunted our own food and raise our kids that way. Then they go to college and get brain washed .