Blowout Kit

In addition to a mini-medical kit (band aids, moleskin, antibiotic, naproxen, caffeine tabs, insect rep., antiseptic wipes, Celox powder, gauze pad, superglue, etc.), I also carry a basic blowout kit (compact pressure dressing, RATS tourniquet, QuikClot combat gauze, Celox with syringe, chest seals, nitrile gloves, medical shears) in my shoulder bag.


On my ankle, I also carry a kit with safety cutting device, tourniquet, hemostatic gauze, SWAT tourniquet/pressure bandage.

1. Dial 911!

2. When sufficiently safe to do so, apply tourniquet over victim’s clothing and move him to cover . Note: Apply tourniquet 2” above injury, but do not apply over a joint. Note when tourniquet was applied.

3. Once under cover, cut away clothing and expose the wound(s) . If wound cannot accommodate at least two fingers, then it is probably too small to pack; instead, use a pressure bandage. Note: Do not attempt to remove knife or other weapon if still in wound.

4. Pack larger wound(s) with gauze. Wrap gauze over first two fingers to explore and begin packing wound. Try to identify the major source of bleeding and explore depth of the cavity. Keep driving gauze into the wound with your two fingers circumferentially, leaving no gap, until filled to the rim.

5. Place remaining gauze over surface of wound and apply direct, uninterrupted pressure for three full minutes. Only then, reexamine wound.

5. Apply a pressure dressing , such as Israeli-type bandage, and elevate the injured part as much as possible.

6. Keep patient warm during examination to avoid hypothermia.
Warm liquids, instant heat packs, or thermal blankets may be needed.

Please share what medical supplies you regularly carry with you, and recommend other or better items and strategies. Thanks!

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Everything but chest seals. I have 6 of these
set up like this. Even have sutures. This one is from my shooting bag. Shooting bag also has GI pressure bandages.

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I have a whole backpack loaded with medical goodies.

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I’m no medic, but I’m pretty sure you can DIY a chest seal with one of those packages after you’ve opened it (and maybe some cloth tape).

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I like to keep lots of goodies at home and in the car. But, I also figure that if I don’t at least have a tourniquet on my body (or something that can be used as a pretty convenient and effective substitute), then I’m probably screwed if I get shot. I know the RATS isn’t ideal, but it sure is compact.

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As a former street corner Dr, You guys have your shit together.
RESPECT!

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As a former combat medic I keep everything but Plasma and blood in my kit, I also keep a lighter battle kit than most people might think. If it comes down to it we probably WONT have access to advanced medical care and people who are too badly injured will just end up being expectant.

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“He’s the one they call Dr. Feelgood” ?

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We treated his customers.
FD/EMTs

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Wear the ankle kit whenever I have pant legs. Put those flat IFAK’s meant to snuggle up to body armor in the pocket on the back of car seats. Stuff everywhere up to the surgical kit in the house, hope none of it sees use.

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Tight in the crotch,
1970
and loose at the ankle.

'Cause that’s how I roll, baby!
:astonished:

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