Constitutional Carry In Texas Dies On The Grounds of Alleged Intimidation

Constitutional Carry In Texas Dies On The Grounds of Alleged Intimidation

Ammoland Inc. Posted on April 7, 2019 by John Crump

Opinion

Glock Gun Flag

Constitutional Carry In Texas Dies On The Grounds of Alleged Intimidation

U.S.A.-(Ammoland.com)-Texas House Speaker Dennis Bonnen declared Constitutional Carry legislation dead after he claimed that members of the gun activist group “Texas Gun Rights” showed up at his house when only his wife and children were home.

Chris McNutt, executive director of Texas Gun Rights vehemently denied Bonnen’s charges claiming that the group was just putting flyers on doors that were encouraging the citizens of Texas to contact their representatives to ask why Constitutional Carry legislation has stalled in the House.

Texas Gun Rights is an affiliate of the National Association For Gun Rights and evidenced by their link to NAGR on their website (see image). The National Association For Gun Rights is false-flag money-collecting organization run by Dudley Brown and has been involved in derailing other pro-gun bills in states like Colorado over the years. AmmoLand News has warned our readers about this group and its many state affiliates over the years.

Texas Gun Rights Screen Grab

Texas Gun Rights is an affiliate of the National Association For Gun Rights and evidenced by their link to NAGR on their website.

“The fear and intimidation used to push this agenda have made it clear this is bad public policy,” Bonnen said in a Facebook post. “These gutless intimidation tactics only embolden me to continue strengthening the rights of law abiding gun owners and keep firearms out of the hands of criminals.”

Texas House Speaker Dennis Bonnen

McNutt responded to Bonnen in his own Facebook post stating: “He is trying to paint the simple act of leaving a flyer on the doors of hundreds of his constituents and donors – asking them to contact their legislators to support a bill– is somehow an act of intimidation.”

Bonnen, a Republican, also accused the gun rights group of going to the house of Rep. Dustin Burrows and posting the street address on Social Media of Rep. Four Price. AmmoLand could not locate a post by Texas Gun Rights nor McNutt that showed anyone’s address. It is possible that these posts were deleted.

AmmoLand inquired to whether the families called the police on the activist, but none of the Representatives answered our questions at the time press. Local police were unable to verify any police calls for the alleged actions of Texas Gun Rights.

The Texas State Rifle Association released a statement condemning the alleged actions of the activist group on their website: “We condemn the inexcusable actions of a fringe gun group who recently resorted to harassment of lawmakers, their staff and their families to such an extent that the Texas Department of Public Safety became involved.”

Bonnen said lawmakers “have been incessantly harassed by fanatical gun rights activists who want to eradicate sensible gun policies.” He noted that Texas Gun Rights wants to put guns in the hands of criminals.

Texas House Speaker Dennis Bonnen

Texas House Speaker Dennis Bonnen

“I have always been at the forefront of strengthening Texans’ 2nd Amendment rights, as exhibited by my 100% voting record with the NRA,” Bonnen stated in a Facebook post. “I supported legislation giving every citizen the ability to receive their license to openly carry, and believe that repealing these laws – as fringe activists want –would make it impossible for law enforcement to distinguish between law abiding gun owners and criminals.”

Four months ago, The Texas House referred to the Constitutional Carry bill to the House Homeland Security and Public Safety Committee where it has stalled. Bonnen appointed Democrat Poncho Nevárez to chair the committee.

The bill was supposed to get a hearing last Wednesday, but Nevárez canceled it at the last minute. According to Democrats, the proposed law change will no longer get a hearing in the committee leading many to believe he is using the situation to kill the bill.

“I wasn’t canceling the hearing. I was postponing it,” Nevárez said. “But … once they started harassing, one, the speaker, and then these other representatives for no good reason, then I think it’s incumbent upon me not to reward bad behavior or make them believe that somehow this harassment led to me giving them a hearing.”

As of now Constitutional Carry in the Lone Star state is dead thanks to Republicans and the interference of TGR/NAGR.

None of the parties involved responded to AmmoLand’s request for comments by the time of publishing.

4 Likes

Whats the next step for them? They cant fight this?

2 Likes

Can anyone elaborate on what is being said about NAGR and it’s derailment of other pro-gun legislation?

I also noticed that in the last article posted here, the Repubican speaker Bonnen said “THEIR issue is dead” and in this article, Democrat Navarez says “…I think it’s imcumbent upon me not to reward bad behavior or make THEM believe somehow this harrasment led me to giviing THEM a hearing.”

I think these representatives have failed to acknowldege that “THEIR and THEM” is ALL the residents of the State of Texas and NOT some gun activist or group.
This legislation is not something to be used as a game and withheld because they want to punish one person or a small group of people.

2 Likes

sounds like a bunch of “smoke and mirrors” BS to me. doesnt seem to be any evidence of harassment at all. unless i missed something.

6 Likes

Seems as if there is quite a bit of politics involved, toward the end of the Legislative Session, where they “do not have to” address the issue.

3 Likes

Politish to English translate results:

Politish
“The fear and intimidation used to push this agenda have made it clear this is bad public policy,”
English
“I am afraid of The People, therefore it is best to keep people from exercising their rights”

Politish
“These gutless intimidation tactics only embolden me to continue strengthening the rights of law abiding gun owners and keep firearms out of the hands of criminals.”
English
“I was looking for a reason to ensure we continue to infringe the rights of the people, and in the absence of any real reason I will use this… And call them criminals in the process… Yay”

Politish
“fanatical gun rights activists who want to eradicate sensible gun policies”
English
“Americans who want to practice their rights uninfringed by government”

Politish
“I have always been at the forefront of strengthening Texans’ 2nd Amendment rights, as exhibited by my 100% voting record with the NRA,I supported legislation giving every citizen the ability to receive their license to openly carry, and believe that repealing these laws – as fringe activists want –would make it impossible for law enforcement to distinguish between law abiding gun owners and criminals.”
English
“I will pretend to be for the right to OWN and CARRY as provided by the 2nd amendment to the constitution of the USA, but only when we turn this right into a privilege by foregoing the whole Citizenship is the license to OWN and CARRY, and make the government decide who can and cannot CARRY. I will further muddy the waters and say it would be harder (like in conceal carry) for law enforcement to distinguish who is who…” … Because, you know, it is much harder for law enforcement to spot if someone is armed when they open carry…

RINOs should be exposed.

7 Likes

Texas has, in my opinion, a undue and unwarranted reputation as being some big pro-gun/pro2A State when it reality it really isn’t.

3 Likes

You are quite correct. Californians and northeasterners started invading in the 1990’s en masse turning it from a free state to a middle of the road state with firearm and knife laws that are / were a joke. Make no mistake, Texas WILL be the next Washington / Oregon / Colorado very soon. It almost is now. I fucking hate it here. I cannot get the hell out fast enough.

1 Like

Texas went left years ago and the people of Texas don’t have a hair left on any of their nuts, and I will say that to the face of any Texan. I left Texas due to how left it was going 10 years ago. It will vote nearly full democrat in 5 to 10 years.

1 Like

Get away from the big city’s and you will still find the old Texas.

3 Likes

and that means in 5 years you are Illinois, New York, California ect…
When the large cities go left they dictate the policies that make the small town folks criminals… I’ve been fighting it in Tennessee for 10 years.

2 Likes

It is BUT, the Houston, Austin, Dallas, SA, libtards are the ones that are often heard. I assure you, we are very pro gun. I hope we never have to prove it.

2 Likes

Where ya gonna go? It will follow you. Some times you just need to make a stand.

2 Likes

You’re right, it will eventually follow us all no matter where we go. The fact is politics thing aside, I still hate it here–a lot. Too hot, no natural beauty in 95% of the state and I just don’t want to be here any more because of all of the transplants and refugees from other shitty states. Those are just a few of the main reasons why. The politics thing is just the last nail in the coffin.

2 Likes

I left San Antonio because it had already gone so far left that they where tearing down “offensive material” in the Alamo… Your state is doomed. The time for armed intervention is over either take back the cities or leave because your tax dollars are CURRENTLY paying to push legislature that takes away your freedoms.

2 Likes

I hear ya brother. I’m too hard headed. Probably fighting a lost cause but i’m stubborn like that. Probably the Irish in me. Lol

1 Like

Hah, understandable mate! :cowboy_hat_face: You and my dad would get along. He doesn’t fully understand why we want to leave and wishes we would stay and make a stand. Problem is even if Texas was a complete utopia for the constitution it will NEVER have this kind of view from one’s property and that is that. If we could swing dealing with AK’s winters shit we’d move up there like my brother did.

image

3 Likes

Leave to where? Name one place on the planet this shit won’t creep into. I would love to run to a paradise but reality sinks in and i’m faced with the fact that socialists are everywhere. We have to stop running. That’s part of the problem.

2 Likes

I know what you mean @Chuparosa. I lived in TX all my life, 41+ years (minus six years in CA as a kid) and had wanted to move from there for most of those years. Finally did in 2016. I was in deep SE Texas, the Piney Woods. Of course, the piney woods means paper company land with the skinniest straightest pine trees and no branches.
Hot, humid, no jobs, nothing to do, and like you said, no natural beauty. No beatiful mountains, no snow, not too many lakes, streams or rivers to speak of. Did I mention hot??!!!

If anyone doesn’t undertand the humidity and heat there, fly down to Houston or Dallas and when you are leaving the airport and those doors open up to the outside and your hair instantly falls and you’re sweating like a pig before you even get to your car, you’ll understand. It’s like that all year round. Too hot to even enjoy the outdoors. No spring and fall. Just summer with some wet nasty icy mess for a month in winter (February). Just enough to make the pipes in your house freeze and break.

I know Texas is supposed to have this great economy and jobs, but that’s in the cities apparently and most of Texas is rural areas. Most small towns, if there is an employer, you get the luxury of working at the local paper or lumber mill. Around Baytown/LaPorte/Pasadena you can work at one of the refineries. That’s if your town has an employer. My son drives an hour and a half to get to work (one way) at one of the mills. The speed limit is so fast there because we have to drive so damn far to get to shopping or work that it would take us all day at 55mph. But I think most Texans ignore the 70 or 75mph signs too. I did.

I’ve worked all over the state of Texas because of the job I had, and honestly didn’t see anywhere in the state I would live. Property prices have skyrocketed, taxes are high, gas is high (not sure why) and the state does have its share of regulations.

I do miss Texas. Texans have this pride that even when you move, no matter how much you hated the state, you do miss it. I will always call myself a Texan. All my family is still there. I’ve driven back down to TX from Indiana about 9 times since I have moved. A good drive. But everytime I get there, I realize immediately why I left and I’m glad I did. Now I’m stuck with corn fields. Hope to remedy that soon. Anyway, I care what happens to Texas, and if the State ever needed me to defend it, I’d be right there.

4 Likes

Very well said @RedAngel, very well said. While I may miss my childhood memories and most of my family here I won’t miss anything else about it as you mention. And the job market even in the cities is shit unless you’re in a very specialized field higher than middle mgmt.

Thing is people from other states don’t truly understand how hot AND humid most of Texas is outside of the coast. DFW is stupid got and humid. 110+ with 50-60%+ humidity in the summer gets old quickly. Haha.

The only parts of the state I like are Alpine, Palo Duro Canyon and Big Bend. And maybe the area just south of Carlsbad.

2 Likes