Double Actions

Get this thread started with a couple of range shooters in stainless, both shot a lot of Wednesday night steel and the 44 shot a lot of Sunday USPSA.


Top S&W 629 Classic with a #29 cylinder, recessed for moon clips. Barrel spun and pinned, forcing cone trued, shimmed and fitted internals, and all screws point the same direction! Work courtesy of Gunny over in PA. Walnut? grip from Brownells. Fast and smooth shooting DA wheel gun.
Bottom Rossi M986 “Cyclops” 357 Mag. factory undercut porting. Polished internals and zebrawood grip from my own shop. Sweet shooting iron, even with full blow loads.

629
629 with SS and CS cylinders

Rossi_Cylinder

Also did a moonclip cylinder for the Rossi, but the metal between the shells was so thin that I really had a tough time finding brass with enough slot above the rim. Moonclips deformed if you looked at them sideways. Dowell just off to the low left was used to support the star while cutting the recess.

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That’s an interesting looking piece, looks tough :+1:

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Made them for only a couple years. Rare but not that valuable. Saw one used in a Burt Reynolds movie albino bad guy was shooting at him with it.

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In Hollywood, albinos are always the bad guy.

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Seriously though, nice examples Al.
I still consider myself a big fan of the Ruger GP100. It can be a little tricky to get the trigger group completely seated upon reassembly, but I love the modular nature when it comes to thorough cleaning. Plus, the medium frame is compact, easily packable, and the grips are easy to switch out. If you need a bigger handle, any grip from the Super Redhawk swaps without modification, and if you want all wood Hogue is there for a reasonable price.
Folks say the 357 is too old and in the way, but the cartridge delivers with the same authority it always has, as long as the right bullet and the right powder are put together.

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How about music?

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The GP100 are fine, looked at one but we chose differently. Our SP101 ‘Belly Gat’ (as my Dad called the type) is perfect for what we got it for. ‘Belly to belly social work’. Fits nicely in a coat pocket, boot or purse. I could see a 5.5" Redhawk to pair up with it though.

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Rugers have some good points, dad’s got a GP and I had a super red 44 until just recently, (moment of weakness and a couple beers traded it for a smith M29 Silhouette).
My opinion the smith is the gold standard for DA revolver triggers, especially if shooting one DA as intended.
I do like the Ruger grips. and the big Ruger carries more mass in the frame, cylinder, and barrel then the smith helping to tame a hard caliber’s recoil.

S&W M29 10-5/8" Silhouette Model.

Front sight with 4 dialup preset elevations

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Wow, that’s cool, never seen one, seems a bit overkill but I’ve not used one so maybe its perfect :man_shrugging:

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Never been to a sanctioned silhouette shoot so not sure the value, but even full blow 44’s have quite a rainbow to their trajectory so who knows. I’ll stretch the barrel out at the next Elmer Keith shoot, see what’s what.

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These have been out for over a year, but still more scratch than I to devote to one. A Ruger that does what this does, a 8 shot 357 cylinder and a 9 mm Luger for moonclips would be high on my list…

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@MAK

I am a big fan, too. This one is my favorite of the bunch:

GP100 6 inch barrel

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@Ridgewalker

Nice! How much - $5,000 ? Either way, only with a big win at lotto or Las Vegas would I be getting one. But, nice to dream about.

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Nice revolver. Like to get my fingerprints on one.

I had a 357/9mm convertible a while back but that 2 thou difference between. 355 and .357 is not negligible. For some reason the 45ACP bullet works in a 45 Colt barrel and shoots accurately, (although groups 6 inches high) but the 9mm was a bit sloppy in the .357 barrel. Patterns not groups. To be fair, only had one sample, Ruger Blackhawk, and didn’t try any fat lead 9mm bullets that may have worked better.
Maybe the 45 has taller lands or maybe because .002 is less of a percentage the larger the bore gets.

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Maybe some Fat Casts would indeed be the ticket. At this point a Ruger is more likely than a Nighthawk. lol :money_mouth_face:

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I guess I’m a bit of a stick in the mud here, but is it just me who looks at that Korth and says…do I have enough time left on this planet to keep that thing clean???
But then, if I could afford such premier machinery, I could probably pay someone to take a brush to all those cuts and bands. Not being a member of that club, I’m just guessing…still I just can’t see any genuine point to all that visual mangling.
Now, if one could get the 8 shot without the circus cuts, then I would really wish to pack one around for a while.
Coming back to reality, yep, that 6" barrel length GP100 is a very good choice. Whilst there have been enough studies to prove that barrel length and velocity are associated rather than directly related, barrel length of 6" + has consistently proven to be the best with Magnum cartridges. The current sub 4" trend has more to do with carrying in tight quarters than offering optimum ballistics.
I honestly can’t imagine that shooting a snub nose 357 would in any way be enjoyable, but that’s me, I’d guess that somewhere there is someone who can’t live without powder burns and heavy duty tinnitus.
Personally, I believe that cartridges like the 38s are made for small frame revolvers with abbreviated barrels.

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Yep it sure is some nice eye candy. Do like that GP100, and more realistic too. The DLC stuff we have is real easy to clean up though. A squirt and a wipe.

As far as shooting a 357 Snubbie w/o hearing protection that would be marginally preferable to being a crime stat. So we shoot ours with hearing protection, as we do everything. Yep it is stout. We rarely shoot the 357 at the range usually its loaded with 38 instead, but sometimes we will shoot the 357 in the SP in a final volley for each of us.

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A little bit of real world practice helps to keep one sharp, but as someone who has tinnitus, I can say that hearing protection around machinery and loud noises is never wasted.
Decibel reduction is something useful, it has nothing to do with weakness of any sort.
In terms of the 9mm/ 357 switch cylinder, in Europe, this has been a popular choice for decades. Usually, the way this is done is through deepening the grooves, whilst raising the lands. Some of these bores are squeezed down pretty tight, which enables the skinny 9mm- in comparison to the 357-to get a good seat. Of course this also means higher pressures, but the European methodology behind steel strength and pressure seems to take this into account.
Maybe the one exception is Spain. Spanish arms have been all over the board in terms of quality. Even going back to WW1, they sold lots of cheap and dubious quality arms to the French.
European arms ownership is pretty ridiculous. Speaking of France, I recall hearing from a Frenchman some years ago who was switching away from modern to more historic arms because he was sick of all the paperwork, but there are Europeans who love guns as much as we do. They wouldn’t have built 357 / 9mm switch cylinders if they couldn’t make them work.

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I suffer from tinnitus as well. Different explosions than firearms though they didn’t help. What hearing I have I am jealous of and wear double protection on the range.

Looking for something to wear in the woods and at work and still maintain comms.

TFB has some articals and reviews :wink: hear:

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Years ago, I fired a 4 inch barrel .357 magnum in the outdoors (on a farm), alternating between .38 specials and .357 magnums - all without any hearing protection. At first, I could hear a big difference. But, after firing a few cylinders’ full, I could barely tell the difference. And yes, I have tinnitus nowadays.

More recently, I fired at the range (with hearing protection on), a Ruger LCR (1.875 inch barrel), using .357 magnums. Yeah, that was a bit loud even with the hearing protection. I learned then that i don’t need to repeat that since it was so loud, and the recoil very abrupt and hard to manage.

I used to keep .38 special ammo together with .357 magnum ammo. No more. I rarely use the .357 magnum ammo, but the .38 special I use a lot - particularly on the range (it is one of my primary defense rounds, so I practice with it a lot).

FYI - If you want to get attention on the pistol range (especially if it is an indoor range), fire .357 magnums out of a snubnose. It works every time.

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