[Feedback Please] The 9/11 Attacks: Understanding Al-Qaeda and the Domestic Fall-Out from America's Secret War

Feedback please on our new The 9/11 Attacks: Understanding Al-Qaeda and the Domestic Fall-Out from America's Secret War piece, whose intro is below:

With American military personnel now entering service who were not even alive on 9/11, this seems an appropriate time to reexamine the events of September 11, 2001 – the opaque motives for the attacks, the equally opaque motives for the counter-offensive by the United States and its allies known as the Global War on Terror, and the domestic fall-out for Americans concerned about the erosion of their civil liberties on the homefront.

Before venturing further, it’s worth noting that our appraisal is not among the most common explanations. Osama bin Laden, his lieutenants at Al-Qaeda, and the men who carried out the attack against the World Trade Centers and the Pentagon are not “crazy,” unhinged psychopaths launching an attack against the United States without what they consider to be good reason.

Nor do we consider then-President George W. Bush to be either a simpleton, a willing conspirator, an oil profiteer, or a Machivellian puppet whose cabinet were all too happy to take advantage of a crisis.

The American press tends to portray its leaders as fools and knaves, and America’s enemies as psychopathic. Keeping the narrative simple – “Black and white,” “good versus evil,” “right and wrong,” etc. – is intellectually easy, even with something as complex as the 9/11 attacks.

Instead, it is our considered opinion that the events of 9/11 and those that followed in direct response to the attacks – including the invasion of Iraq – were carried out by good faith rational actors who believed they were acting in the best interests of their religion or their nation.

This does not in any way absolve the principals from moral responsibility for the consequences of their actions. It does, however, provide what we believe to be a more accurate and nuanced depiction of events than is generally forthcoming from any sector of the media – because we see these principals as excellent chess players who, in the broad sweep of events, engaged in actions which are explicable....

Because the propaganda machine hammered away so heavily on the “cowardly men who hate our freedom” line, there was not much in the way of careful consideration of the actual political motives of the hijackers, the Petro-Islam that funded them, the ancient, antagonistic split between Sunni and Shi’a, the fall-out from the 1979 Iranian revolution or the 1970s energy crisis, the historical context of covert American involvement in the Soviet-Afghan War and the Iran-Iraq War of the 1980s, nor the perceived “imperialist humanitarianism” of American military adventures of the 1990s in Muslim nations like Bosnia, Iraq, Somalia and Kosovo. Alone, none of these factors were deadly. Combined, they provided a lethal combination.

Our The 9/11 Attacks: Understanding Al-Qaeda and the Domestic Fall-Out from America's Secret War piece continues over at Ammo.com.

One of our motivations for sharing it here is because we don’t allow comments on our site due to all the moderation which trolls, bots, etc. take up. However we do read what fellow Full 30 members say about our work, so don’t hesitate to chime in below.

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"What is less often talked about is perhaps an even more stunning feat the hijackers pulled off: Being able to evade the attention of the United States intelligence community while planning their attacks. Indeed, their acumen with regard to covert operations was so great that they were effectively able to steal an air force for the attacks. It’s not that they were absent from the radar of U.S. intel services – … "

“It’s worth noting that 9/11 was a massive intelligence failure on the part of the NSA and the CIA. Rather than being held to account, they had their powers massively expanded in the wake of the attacks.”

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It is about Right and Wrong, The attacks on 9/11 were wrong and we were Right to seek payback/justice/retaliate or whatever word suits you. IMO having served in Afghanistan we did it wrong, we wasted Billions trying to win hearts and minds, We should have used every bomb and bomber and pounded them day and night not worrying about collateral damage, they did not worry about it on 9/11…took out anything that produced electricity, water, phone systems, hospitals, every bridge, every road and made it as impossible as we could for them to have few avenues as possible to fight back, blot out the sky with armed drones to destroy anything that moved, man or beast. as soon as we tried to appease them, we lost and they knew it.

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It is about Right and Wrong, The attacks on 9/11 were wrong and we were Right to seek payback/justice/retaliate or whatever word suits you. IMO having served in Afghanistan we did it wrong, we wasted Billions trying to win hearts and minds, We should have used every bomb and bomber and pounded them day and night not worrying about collateral damage, they did not worry about it on 9/11…took out anything that produced electricity, water, phone systems, hospitals, every bridge, every road and made it as impossible as we could for them to have few avenues as possible to fight back, blot out the sky with armed drones to destroy anything that moved, man or beast. as soon as we tried to appease them, we lost and they knew it.

Well said RJ, and what you said brings to mind the following quote from Gen. Curtis Lemay on the all-out bombing campaign the U.S. didn’t do at the beginning of the Korean War:

“So we go on and don’t do it, and let the war go on. Over a period of 3 and a half or four years, we did burn down every town in North Korea. And every town in South Korea. And what? Killed off 20% of the Korean population. What I’m trying to say is, once you make a decision to use military force to solve your problem - then you ought to use it. And use an overwhelming military force. Use too much. And deliberately use too much. So that you don’t make an error on the other side, and not quite have enough. And you roll over everything to start with. And you close it down just like that. You save resources. You save lives. Not only your own but the enemies too. And the recovery is quicker. And everybody is back to peaceful existence - hopefully in a shorter period of time.”

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Should have been NOTHING there but HUGE glass ashtrays on 9-12
Eisenhower warned ya.

https://avalon.law.yale.edu/20th_century/eisenhower001.asp

Prolonged war = huge profits for war profiteers.
F*****G RAT =

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Thanks again for your feedback. We updated this w/a new section called The Western Way of War where we go into Gen. Lemay’s philosophy:

"While the United States undertook a prompt response – the invasion of Afghanistan – it did not undertake the same measures as it did for the purpose of winning World War II (namely overwhelming and overly destructive force). There were, of course, the two atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but also overwhelming destructive force throughout the war in the form of carpet bombings, flame throwing tanks, and picket destroyers. The carnage of Okinawa fundamentally changed how the West viewed war, particularly against the fanatical Japanese.

Gen. Curtis Lemay was an architect of this strategy and advocated it not only in Korea (where it was not used), but also Vietnam, where his advocacy of keeping the nuclear option open is often cited as one of the things that destroyed the 1968 presidential campaign of George Wallace – for whom Lemay was the vice presidential candidate. The idea was that overwhelming destructive force led to fewer casualties for the Allies. Here, Gen. Lemay discusses the concept with regard to the Korean War:

“What I’m trying to say is, once you make a decision to use military force to solve your problem – then you ought to use it. And use an overwhelming military force. Use too much. And deliberately use too much. So that you don’t make an error on the other side, and not quite have enough. And you roll over everything to start with. And you close it down just like that. You save resources. You save lives. Not only your own but the enemies too. And the recovery is quicker. And everybody is back to peaceful existence – hopefully in a shorter period of time.”

America spends billions of dollars developing highly destructive military technology. But since World War II, it has failed to deploy this in the defense of its citizenry."

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I dont see why a nuke couldnt be dropped it worked wonders on getting Japan to knock it off.

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Why don’t we give this a try . The next time the Iranian revolution ary guard has a parade we send a wave of 100 a10s right down the parade route.

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I lost a lot of friends in that war… And its the campaign that changed me forever.
that being said…

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