Firearms training simulator


#1

I’ve been practicing more and more on the virtual reality training simulator at my range(Virtra 3D firearms training simulator) I have found it to be a great training tool in addition to live fire and training/courses. Anyone looking to supplement their training with something different I would highly recommend it to anyone that has access to one, it’s extremely realistic and a whole lot of fun.


#4

Robert:

When the blood looks too real? And you can actually run out of bullets?

LOL (ish)


#6

If the cars going by are the same, then no, you have not left it.


#7

There’s a place nearby where there’s a 3D simulator and they stick an electrode on your back to simulate being shot. You get shocked with like 80,000 volts if you ‘get shot’. I suppose that’s to reproduce the adrenaline. I’ve never tried it, but I might. They have other training I might take first. Seems like something I should work up to. :grimacing:


#8

Never had tried one nor have I heard of one really. I must live in the dark ages.

Holycow does that look like a whole lot of fun!

Thanks for shedding light on it!


#9

Hmmm, 80,000 volts is a LOT.

Not sure I would let someone run that much electricity thru me.

But then, you would need to know the amps, too, to know how much damage it could do.

Complicated!


#10

I did watch it when someone else was doing it. Amps aren’t that high but you can tell it smarts.


#11

It’s basically like a taser. And it’s a 2 second shock. It was clear when it shocked the guy he got distracted. It’s point is to train you to stay in the fight.
The training I’m sure is awesome but it’s $100+ per month membership.


#12

So, typical stun gun has 50,000 volts.

But of course, the math is more than volts.

Amps = Volts divided by Ohms.

Amps is the current. (like electrical shotgun pellets having been shot out of a gun)
Volts is the force. (sort of like the feet per second that the blast of electrical pellets is traveling)
Ohms is the resistance. (note: if the electrode is placed on wet skin, you could lose 90% of your resistance)
(so, your skin acts as body armor, but if wet, not very effective at all)

Then, of course, you have length of time that it is applied.

So, complicated - sort of like figuring out the likely destructive capability of a bullet fired from a gun.


#13

EQuinn
The Virtra 3D trainer that I practice on does not contain an electric shock, it’s identical to the system in the video that Wildlife posted.


#14

We live in the matrix anyways.


#15

There used to be a bunch of Namco video games, using a very accurate light gun that were very close to the quality of the simulators.
Unfortunately they only work with the old style CRT tvs and the early Playstations.
Too bad they got obsolete.
But there’s some still around and well worth hunting for, especially since they can be used at home.


#16

MACS for the Super Nintendo comes to mind. But good luck, that shits expensive.