Glock 43 Trigger Job


#1

Hey Guys so i just uploaded a new video on my Youtube Channel it is Part 4 to the Glock 43 Build i am doing. This portion is on the Triggerjob, i do a Comparison of the before trigger pull weight, after stoning and polishing with original factory connector, and after installing a aftermarket connector. check out the video if this interests you and i hope you guys enjoy.

https://youtu.be/TmU6zbQaIgI


#2

Yeah, from my own experience, the key component to improving Glock triggers is the connector.


#3

The Connector helps, but stoning and polishing key contact points make a world of a difference. to smooth out the grittiness in the trigger pull.


#4

How effective just replacing the connector can improve things depends on the connector.
The biggest improvement seemed to be the one a local gunsmith friend made himself.
It was the only one that actually made an honest 3 and a half trigger without any other work.
All the others claimed to do so, but his did it.
He angled the ramp of the connector, where the trigger bar contacts it, by hand many times.
Not exactly a profitable way to go about it, but it was the best one of all.
When he was done, he handed it to me along with a stock connector and told me to try it.
It was easy to duplicate once an expert shows ya’ how.


#5

Nice!!!, yea for the most part the drop in connectors are not really accurate. it is more of a approximate. but sounds interesting. how is he changing the angle if you do not mind me asking. is he bending the metal to change the angle on the ramp of the connector, or filing the metal to the desired angle?


#6

He did it with a small file, in very tiny increments.
The hard part was reassembling everything to check the results over and over.
But once he succeeded, it was easy to duplicate without needing all those
.


#7

Sweet. i got the overall idea of it. i will attempt with a old connector to try it out.


#8

I’m my experience polishing the connector and the sear is needed in almost every striker fire pistol
I do a lot of them at the shop
More often than not we have to do it to aftermarket trigger when people buy trigger kits any way


#9

@g.willikers And then you have those that come in because they rounded off the sear and have doubles and triples at the range. I’ve had z few of those at my old shop. (Customer: I watched a video and I don’t know what happened.)


#10

Honestly I make a living off of bubba
Bubba takes Dremel tools to parts that he has no clue what he is doing
Lots of factory Glock triggers and M&p
1911’s that grip saftey and trigger bars don’t line up and sears files down unrest of sand paper or emery board
I give people credit for trying themselves honestly that’s how most gunsmithing starts
Some go to schools like me I attended Pgs for a year and went and worked for a gunsmith for free for 8 months before he let me work for money
I stared learning when I was 25 from a gunsmith that never went to school and started off with simple measuring and using a caliper
There is guns that show up now that I’ve never encountered like working on a Wilson combat edc x and just simple tuning for the user
When this weapon comes out of the box ready to go
Point being you learn as you go
And most days I do mundane things that anyone could do if they apply themselves


#11

That’s awesome. And you are correct everyone starts somewhere.


#12

One of the reasons I would be hesitant to buy a used 1911 or AR.
Never know what’s been attempted by someone who shouldn’t have.
More so than most any other models it seems.


#13

Generally it’s strikerfired guns that need fixed
Most 1911 come with a great trigger out of the box
The problem with the 1911 is when bubba buys a gi version and wants to install a grip saftey


#14

AR15s are easy to work on. The only thing to really “fu** up” is when installing the barrel. The rest is like legos.