Gun Ranges and Steel Ammo

Being a MilSurp shooter I use surplus ammo for plinking with often.
But I have seen a disturbing trend at gun ranges.
They are restricting ammo to the magnet test.
If a magnet grabs then you cant shoot it here.
They are referring to the bullet itself and I do understand that steel core ammo could damage the steel spinner plates and indoor ranges claim it damages their bullet traps.
True or not I cant say but they are trending to steel jacketed ammo now too. (AKA Bi-metal)
If it attracts a magnet they reject it for use.
I contacted a local range and asked about this and they claimed it was a fire hazard…
Lead core or not a magnet makes it a no go.
I find this reasoning rather illiterate myself and have never seen a fire started by a steel jacketed round or steel core for that matter.
Tracer yes.
Seems as though the ranges are trending toward unreasonable restrictions on their users.
Anyone ran across this trend?
Or am I just being too much of a critic?

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the potential of a steel core striking steel backstops or floor and creating a spark is high, and depending on the range and their “cleaning” it is a real hazard.
And on top of insurance, sue you attitude or liability why take the chance.

and a second view

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I gotta call BS on that.
The fire to start with flared up at the bench and was more like an accelerator lit off from left to right.
And whats with all the wood walls and crap at a gun range?
I think that was 100% staged or a really poor maintained range with a wood floor.
Indoor ranges I may agree steel core may damage their deflectors or something.
But steel jacketed I cant see even doing that.
The jacket is so thin I don’t see how it could do damage.
But like I said I don’t really know about the indoor ranges.
The place I contacted shoots out over a lake outdoors. Perhaps their spinner plates may get damaged by steel core, but steel Jacketed Lead Core?
And why doesn’t it apply to Steel Shot?

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the design of the flooring which collected the unburned powder and the walls ignited because of the egg crate foam sound boards

different range different time but similiar

Coupled fire and evacuation computer simulations are used to numerically reconstruct a fatal fire that occurred in an indoor shooting range in Korea in 2009. Of the 16 occupants, 15 were killed and one survived. The analysis demonstrates that this approach can accurately reproduce the outcome of this fire. The approach is then used to forensically analyse the incident to identify factors significantly contributing to the high loss of life. In particular, occupant response times and flame spread rate over the polyurethane foam (PUF) cladded walls are investigated. The results suggest that it is unlikely that anyone could have survived if response times were greater than 5 s. Furthermore, it is suggested that fatalities couldn’t have been avoided even if response times were zero. It is also demonstrated that gunpowder residue on the PUF walls is the critical factor in producing the high loss of life. The average number of fatalities could be reduced from 14.9 in the reconstruction case to 0.1 if the walls are completely free of gunpowder residue. However, to completely eliminate fire related casualties, it is necessary to use a PUF wall cladding material with low flame spread rates together with an effective gunpowder cleaning system.

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Its not BS, its no different than grain mills or saw mills, microscopic propellants of any kind accumulate to that point, my local range had to spend big bucks on a specific vacuum to clean up for the purpose of not igniting a fire

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Good ventilation equipment is paramount indoor.
Ventalation/air exchange was one of the larger expenses when we redid our indoor range. Well worth it!
Dust explosions are well documented.

Silos can become Atlas rockets in a flash.

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Still looking at more of the outdoor ranges restricting this.
Indoor poorly maintained or designed it could be a problem.
Not many indoor ranges in my area are good for rifles, so looking more towards the outdoor issues.

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Many outdoor public ranges in the Dallas area even prohibit FMJ. One of the few that allows it still prohibits green tip ammo and concealed/open carry even with a license to carry. From what I understand insurance carriers impose the restrictions on the policy.

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fixed

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Insurance Lawyers…
Scum that contributes absolutely nothing to society except heartache, poverty, and stress.
And whats worse is they make the laws we must follow so convoluted you need one of the scumbags to defend yourself.

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Well shoot, I am an insurance Lawyer.

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AND…

WHAT DO YOU HAVE TO SAY FOR YOURSELF???

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Look at his collection…
KA-CHING!!!

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LOL, I lied like a rug, I ain’t gots enough smarts to be a lawyer. I knew i’d get tore up thou. I feel the same as Grenz about a flippin Lawyer, they get put in there with used car salesmen too.

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What to you call a bus-load of lawyers going over a cliff with an empty seat?
A missed opportunity and future lawsuit.

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But I did learn something from this thread, I never realized powder residue would build up and a spark could cause a flame. but when you get to thinkin about it, yeah it’s bound to happen over time with unburned powder adding up.

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Those were some type of blanks or very low recoil type of 12 ga rounds. Look at the video, the ventilation system on that range was down right useless and I would never shoot there with that poor air quality.

An indoor range here burned down as well supposedly due to a tracer round but they were terrible about policing up the unburned powder that accumulates on the floor of the range.

Its the outdoor ranges that I never can understand with the steel prohibitions. They almost all do not have steel down range so fire hazard is low. Usually its a cash grab to make you buy and shoot their over priced ammo.

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The DFW Gun Range in Dallas also burned down. It was an indoor range, but fortunately they rebuilt it and it’s back in business again.

Many years ago, a tire recycling facility in Texas with millions of used tires all piled up caught on fire. Apparently, a spark from a bulldozer that struck the inner steel belt of one of the tires caused the fire. So I guess it’s possible for a spark from a bullet to start a fire indoors or outdoors if it’s steel on steel and the conditions are right.

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The outdoor private range I belong to has steel slats in-bedded within wooden beams to place wooden target stands in down range. The earthen backstop also has some vegetation. I’m guessing if one of those steel slats were exposed and got hit, a spark could result and maybe start a fire. Hope that never happens because I really enjoy that range.

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Not just unburned powder, any place where there’s combustible material in dust form that is airborne is a bomb waiting for ignition. Have you seen the coffee mate explosions. Go find it on you tube. You’ll be amazed.

Silos with corn dust, same thing.

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