Hide from the sky??


#1

#2

how effective is it against thermal imaging?


#3

Better than nothing! Because there is a layer blocking the thermal sensor.
My buddy with a piece of paper covering half of his face. Note no heat signature!


#4

Interesting, thermal imaging and hollow ground sensors would make hiding from drones a big problem. That is pretty neat.


#5

article says it helps mask from thermal imaging detection


#6

It would probably be more effective to have a jammer, or something, that would bring the drone down and it look like a technical malfunction.


#7

a simple wool blanket is very effective for masking a thermal image and so is glass.


#8

EMP works nicely!


#9

Plenty of ways to defeat thermals and not expensive at all.


#10

#11

Drone technology is terrible for us in a lot of ways
Our group had a meeting a while ago and we discussed drones and thermal tech and similar things
We are going to pool some cash together to get some things
But ultimately one of the Vietnam vets that is someone’s father said
Go underground like the Charlie did you serve both purposes


#12

Hollow ground censors and dogs will get you, there is no way to hide in one spot very long.


#13

Wasn’t talking about just one spot


#14

I want to get another group going, its hard to find serious people though.


#15

We have all been together for a while
It’s nice to have


#16

It is.


#17

@ SAK67 - like all things Hollywood doesn’t mean it will work in real life


#18

Ive never fought a Yujita to know how well their thermal imaging works.


#19

I’m still waiting for this shit if it’s legit!


#20

As someone pointed out, staying static too long is not the answer. Thermals can be defeated fairly easily with easily attainable materials. With that said, the old saying of “noise and light discipline” still rings true.

In any conflict with a technologically superior force, mobilty is still key. Along with this involves properly selected and stocked hide sites that do not have easily spotted access routes, cache points for pre-positioning key supplies such as ammo, water, and high energy food stores, and finally a “rear echelon” spot to rest, regroup, and plan. Key to the “rear echelon” location is that it should be unassuming with no “war making materials” stored there so as to provide deception to any forces conducting COIN operations.

I will say from first hand experience that even though current generation night vision and thermals provide a tremendous force multiplier, they are not the “golden bullet”. I remember one engagement in Iraq where we could not spot the enemy that was probing our COP with our thermals or NODs but luckily we had a Aussie combat team working with us that were using GSR and able to track the hostiles well enough so we could use IDF and push their probing back.

If Iraqi insurgents could defeat our NODs and thermals just imagine what Americans here could do with the resources available. Plus it helps that there are a lot of recent combat vets now in society who are well versed on todays technology.