Low recoil, high stopping power


#1

Saw this article and thought it was interesting. Thoughts?

https://www.chuckhawks.com/handguns_handicapped_shooters.htm


#2

I’m not a fan of the .380, the guns tend to be very small, which makes the recoil a bit more snappy. Simply looking at the caliber isn’t the only variable. A gun with a built in brake is a very good idea, but those tend to need more power to work right. It’s a huge juggle between caliber, muzzle velocity, brake or no brake, and handgun weight.


#3


#4

I had one like that in .45acp. It was like holding a jack hammer.


#5

How do you conceal it though? :joy::joy:


#6

Obviously a trench coat! Nobody looks suspicious running around in a trench coat, especially this time of year😂


#7

:laughing: That mental image left me laughing out loud! For real…


#8

Back on topic- do you guys know of handguns with low recoil and good stopping power? Preferably with some concealability (is that a word?)


#9

Glock 26, might suit you well


#10

The polymer gun will reduce felt recoil. The only really good way is to increase weight .


#11

Weight = Good, unless it’s a 44 auto-mag… :smile:


#12

Unfortunately having what people refer to as “stopping power” and less recoil doesn’t go hand in hand. Also being small/ concealable is tough as well. If I may offer a recommendation that gets some one close. I would recommend a Taurus g2c 9mm. You get 12 rounds in a small package. I don’t really ever recommend Taurus, but I have a seen a lot of positive reviews and everyone seems to like them. I even may pick one up. You see them generally go for &200-$250.00
I hope this helps.


#13

Right in the front of the pants. Less recoil, great capacity, good stopping power, and +1 to manhood! :laughing:


#14

Did I hear that right? $5.00 a round?
It ain’t the recoil or “fireball” that scares me. It’s a wallet the empties as fast as that mag.


#15

Magna Port and call it a day.

Small woman with a 460 S&W Magnum…
https://photos.app.goo.gl/yuBtjeuWiLBF1f4H9


#16

Buffalo bore “+p”(yes I know it doesn’t officially exist) .380 ammo. 4 layers of denim and penetrated 13" of ballistics gel. There is a YT vid on it showing the test.

From their website

1200fps M.E. 288 ft. lbs.

NO I do not have any financial ties to them! Just my 380 go to in my Walther PK380!


#17

Honestly any sub compact that can handle 9mm +P will be perfect for this application. 9mm is very controllable and has very good performance in personal protection.

I’m rather keen on this little gem. Because the PPQ trigger is by far the best handgun trigger I’ve ever used.


#18

Also wanted to mention they also have extended magazines (15rds) for it that bump up the round count close to the full size count if you so choose.

http://www.waltherarms.com/handguns/walther-ppq-sc-accessories/


#19

The best way to deal with recoil, regardless of caliber, is through training.
Good gun handling skills easily overcomes the problem.
The bandaids really don’t address it, they just try to hide it.


#20

EQuinn:

What is the minimum number of rounds (capacity) you need/want?

Does it matter to you if it is a revolver, or if it is a semiautomatic?

How big can it be (max # ounces, max dimensions)?

Two ways I know of to get recoil down: (more) weight; and larger (and better fitting) grip.

But, some guns recoil less, but are still harder to shoot. I shoot my PPS M2 (21.6 ounce 9 mm), much better than my SP101 3 inch (roughly 27 ounces, firing .38 special, but can handle .357 mag, too). Not sure why - maybe combo of sights and grip. (Don’t get me wrong, though, I really like both guns.)

What are you really trying to get to/achieve - consistent accuracy?

Regarding the PPQ - check out Hickok45’s video on that, then think about it.

But lately, PPS M2 can sometimes be had for around $300 (and even more often in the low $300’s), so that would be my top suggestion.