Need some fencing suggestions

I’m going to put in a fence myself and need some advice from those who have done it before out in the country. I’ll have ~2 acres to fence (+2 driveway gates) way out in the country. What is the fencing that is both easiest on the body to install oneself as well as is kind to one’s wallet. I had originally wanted to do some basic treated 6x6 posts with some 2x6’s across but that will prove to be pretty expensive. I’d like to be able to keep the dog(s) in and the hogs / etc out. (understanding deer jump up to 8ft so not worried about deer) Woven or welded wire seems to be an inexpensive option, however the thought about having to stretch it myself seems like a lot of trouble. Someone tell me I’m over-thinking or overreacting to it. Chain link sounds both expensive and like trouble–again with the stretching. Barbed wire while the ultimate cheap option isn’t something I may want or that would ultimately prevent the dog(s) from getting out.

So, after spending a ton of time looking at fencing company’s websites, lowes and other stores (tractor supply, etc) I’m not any closer to a decision. :cowboy_hat_face: That’s where you people come in.

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Around the house I used 4x4 post and 2x4s and then switched to steel t post and used 2x4 welded wire to keep my dog in . I did have a 5 ft. wood fence and he would jump it but won’t even try the 4 ft wire. I did use 4x4 post for the corners and gate post . I Wii take some pictures in the morning.

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What kind of dogs are we talking about?

Fencing two acres to keep dogs in probably won’t be too cheap. But for me, since I had to do mine myself, I chose cattle panels.
You will still probably need an auger for all the fence posts to make it easier on yourself.
Probably run ya about $1500 for the panels though, and what ever the cost of the posts you select. You can put a rail at top or bottom to make it pretty, or more rigid or leave it to stand alone. And frame you up some gates using this too.

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Most shock collars are like 50 bucks.

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Unknown

:pleading_face: oops just read the dog part sorry.

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funny I thought he was worried about SHTF and running out of ammo

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We just put in posts on another 5 acres. We have a post driver that goes on the tractor. You need at least 5" posts at the gates and each corner. Another post back about 6 foot from the gates and corners w/a horizontal brace in between. The rest can be t posts. Look at goat fenceing. Smaller than cattle fenceing. We just weave a t post through the fence and stretch with the winch on the 4 wheeler. T posts we just push in with the bucket on the tractor. Hope this helps.

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Well, first you need one them fancy swords called a foil.
Oh, you didn’t mean that kind of fencing.

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Preppers use Katanas , it looks more ninja.

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Well said @shooterrex

Chain link is expensive, unsightly, and it doesn’t last long. I can’t imagine why anyone would want to use that in a rural setting either, but I don’t hate on those that go that route since it’s their money, their choice. :face_with_raised_eyebrow:

:+1: on the goat fence @shooterrex mentions. I bought all mine at Rural King or Tractor Supply. We have a coyote problem around here so it works for that and keeping our cattle dogs in, but really nothing smaller than that in or out. It’ll do a fine job keeping hogs out for sure. But typically, anything that can fit through goat fence is not very threatening -well… unless you consider snakes and skunks threatening that is. :slight_smile:

Red Brand is the stuff to get. It’s very high quality and really easy to work with. Buy the biggest roll they make since it’s cheaper that way. The rolls are heavy, but you just lay it on its side and roll out where you want to go. It’ll stand right up when you start to stretch it. And the stretching is a no brainier: I actually squeeze the fencing at the pull point between two 2x4’s cut to length, held together with C clamps (keeps you from damaging the fence this way too) and use the tow hooks on my truck with a couple ratchet straps for pulling and fine tuning (so easy I bet even a fancy street Jeep could do it, lol). I used 6" diameter posts for all gates and H-sections with standard T-posts spaced at 12’ intervals in between.

Running fence line is no joke @Chuparosa It’s going to be a lot of work if you do it yourself. And the ground in Texas is hard so you’re going to want to rent some equipment to drill post holes and drive T-posts. When you watch those instructional videos online and see them driving in T-posts by hand with 3-4 whacks, well… that’s fine and dandy for soft dirt pastures in the topsoil rich Midwest, but not how it’ll work in the dry Texas hard pan.

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Cedar split rail looks good and is easy (with an earth auger) it draws a line, dogs are very territorial, they’ll know that line and chase anything out.

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I’m thinking perhaps doing a nice wood fence up front with field fencing around the sides and back of the property. So at least the front will not be fugly. If we get enough equity from the sale of our house perhaps I can still do a wooden fence all around. I guess I’ll have a better idea on what we can afford to do once our house sells.

Greyhound, though he won’t jump much anymore. He’s a retired racer. We do plan on getting a Collie and those damn things are smart as shit and can jump/dig. Possibly getting a shepard of some kind as well.

There is thankfully a fence around the backyard but not on all sides of the property and isn’t all that big or tall.

Agree 100% if we go that route.

We are fortunate here, we are on a mound of sandy loam and farmland soil mix and this stuff is super soft.

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If you plan to sell in a few years you need to see what will give you the most return on investment.

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Or, you could hire some of these guys to keep folks off of your property. :smile_cat:

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That’s exactly what my Dad used for our backyard fence at a house we used to own many years ago. I was 13 years old at the time and I helped him build it. If we could do it, anyone can.

Ours looked something like some of the wire meshed split rails depicted at this website:

http://www.northgeorgiafencecompany.com/html/split_rail.html

We just propped the wire mesh rolls up along the fence and rolled them along as we went to install them.

It kept our older collie in. But our smaller mutt was able to jump over it. If you have athletically agile dogs, you might want to make it taller.

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^ That is close to what I was going to do originally. Only using less expensive lumber. While we will move to ID in 4-5 years we may end up keeping this property…

Meet with our realtor tomorrow and I hope this dude can sell our house for a good amount (and quickly, clock’s tickin’) so we have some sizable equity to use for this and other purposes. I really want a wood fence with wire similar to that link you showed me.

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I think I remember you saying y’all were moving to the Hill Country or somewhere near there. That’s a nice part of Texas. I’d definitely keep it! Post pictures of it when you get it!

As for selling, we sold our house in Lancaster in less than a week about 3 1/2 years ago. Still more and more folks pouring in from out of state to the DFW area by the day. I wouldn’t be surprised if you sold yours just as quickly for its asking price.

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We used farm wire with wood posts but that was long ago before the t post was popular. Using a mother-in-law you can drive the metal t posts easily. Periodically use a RR tie and brace it with an angle post and you can use it to stretch the wire pretty tight with the stretcher available at farm stores. You can also use a pickup to stretch the wire. Once it is secure on the RR tie you can attach it to the metal posts by the little gadgets onthe post . You just put the wire in the gadget and hit it with a hammer to secure it. Then you can put a row of barbed wire at the bottom to discourage digging under it and one on top for the jumpers. That might be your least expensive route.

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We did a pasture for sheep 10 years back - about 330 feet on a side - working around two 660 ft fencing rolls plus four gates (two eight ft so I can get the tractor and 6’ mower deck in and two four ft for foot traffic on the other edges) - and used 8" x 8’ treated posts buried three and a half feet, spaced 20 ft but partnered in the corners with 6" x 8’ cross-posts and drilled pins, wrapped in welded wire and then a top high-tension wire. That was the least expensive option I priced out. It’s still holding up well with just the occasional torque on the high-tension ratchets.

WELL worth the price to have someone come drill the posts with an auger. The rest is not difficult and a pair of $50 fence jacks will stretch as much as you need and have many other uses afterwards. I bought one and borrowed a second.

No more sheep but it’s a great exercise area for our Airedale and the chickens have semi-protection while ranging.

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Thanks all. Gives me some options and wisdom. :+1:

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