Pistol Manual Safety Concealed Carry Considerations - BoomStick Tactical


#1

What are your thoughts on manual safeties on carry guns? The article and video have some interesting points.


#2

Can’t go wrong with an added safety feature, in my opinion. As long as you train & practice to achieve good muscle memory to make disengagement of safety 2nd nature. Good vid sir


#3

Yes you can.

The worst thing that can happen when you pull a gun in a defensive manner is it doesn’t go bang when you want it to. I don’t know how many times I’ve seen people go to shoot their gun and forget to turn off the safety. I think I’ve seen it at every class I’ve been to when someone has a manual safety gun and I regularly see it at matches, with rifle and pistol.

Even with training and practice, it still happens. Training to turn off the safety EVERY TIME requires a lot more practice than most people think. In my experience, the type of person who wants the added safety feature isn’t the kind of person to put in enough training to train that away.

Also, (in my experience) most of the people who want a manual safety simply want a safety on their gun and don’t realize that striker fire guns also have safeties. It’s just with a striker fire safety, disengaging the safety is the same thing as pulling the trigger.

Even with training, you can go through the motions of disengaging a manual safety and fail to do so. Stress is a helluva drug and it causes people to make easy mistakes.

IMO, a manual safety is an advanced shooter feature, but many (if not most) of the people who want them are inexperienced shooters who are unsure about their firearms handling skills and want the safety to feel safer while handling the gun.


#4

Good points @brianpurkiss
I agree with you on most points of that. I use & practice with both types & im comfortable with or without the manual safety.


#5

Me, too.
But switching back and forth from a pistol with a safety and one without can cause a hesitation and delay in shooting.
It can take precious time to switch the brain over to match the pistol.
The more one trains and practice the quicker the change over.
But it’s always there.
For quite a few years, I ran three guns at many matches and training sessions.
A Glock 17, a CZ clone and a 1911.
It can get confusing, even with plenty of practice.
To really try to get as good as possible, I finally abandoned all but the 1911.


#6

I usually either carry my 1911 or my full size Smith & Wesson M&P 2.0, both have manual safeties


#7

Whole this topic is beaten to death it’s all in the user
I carry a 1911 because I love the 1911 it’s has a saftey so I’ve learned to use that saftey
I have other guns that don’t have a manual saftey and I’ve trained without them

It’s prepostirus to say one is better than the other

Just for shits and giggles
What do you do when your child finds your loaded striker fired gun chambered and wants to pick it up and play with it when your not around

The manual saftey can be a good thing
I know some of you folks here are younger and most pistols don’t come with them anymore but they can be practical

Would you remove the manual saftey from your rifle that your so confident in your abilities ?


#8

I would ask why someone would leave a loaded and chambered gun of any kind out where a kid could find it. If you own a gun you have a responsibility to make sure it is stored correctly where kids can’t get their hands on it.


#9

Keep the guns locked up when I’m not around so this doesn’t happen in the first place.

A manual safety is easy to disengage as well. So the exact same question can be applied to a gun with a safety anyways.


#10

I agree totally
My point being it happens
I don’t do it I have children but some do and it’s a quite valid question


#11

Apples and oranges.

The external safety on a rifle is because the trigger doesn’t get covered. An uncovered trigger needs a safety due to external sources getting caught in the trigger area.

The “manual safety” on a striker fire gun is the holster.


#12

That’s subjective and avoiding the point


#13

weapons with manual safeties have been around and successfully protected people’s lives for a very very long time. so I’d have to agree it comes down to the end user and their personal preference. Both are adequate setups and as with anything, practice makes perfect


#14

It’s not avoiding the point.

The reason I have an external safety on a rifle is because an exposed trigger.

The reason I don’t have an external safety on a pistol is because the trigger is covered.

I don’t trust an external safety to keep a kid from shooting a gun.

What am I avoiding?

Edit: The reason for an external safety on a rifle isn’t subjective. The holster being the “external safety” on a striker fire isn’t subjective. External safeties not being sufficient for kid safety measures isn’t subjective.

The selection of striker fire vs external safety on a gun is subjective though.


#15

The point being that a saftey feature is just that
A saftey feature
The other day you said something about a bedside rifle
Do you have children ?
Would you have a bedside rifle present if you did

This debate is argued over all the time
I’m in now say pointing Fjngers saying one is wrong and the other is better
My point being is that there are uneducated people that I see all the time in this industry and there first impulse when holding a weapon is to put there finger on the trigger
Unintentionally most times a saftey is just a safeguard for situations like this


#16

Why do they have access to this firearm? The biggest saftey is between your ears.


#17

Not every gun owner is as saftey conscious as the next


#18

I see your point but I dont recommend leaving guns where kids can get to them.
This really is just another AR vs AK style debate…OBVIOUSLY the AR is superior, but my point is everybody is entitled to their own opinion.


#19

I agree
This question was supposed to be a debate
I made it such with a few questions that can be sore spots


#20

I like those types of threads.