Poll: Do individuals have a right to make their private property gun-free?

The Second Amendment tells government whether they can make areas gun-free. What about a person with his own personal or private property? Where can a private person make a gun-free zone?

  • Never
  • In their own home, but nowhere else
  • Home and certain businesses
  • Any property

0 voters

9 Likes

The constitution does not permit the government, state or federal, to declare anything gun free. Nothing!

11 Likes

I’m choosing home and certain businesses, since a person should be allowed to do what he wants with his own private living space. And certain businesses with similar restricted access should be allowed the same control over their own property, like a psychiatrist’s office, or a bank’s vault area.

10 Likes

The way I took your question was if government can restrict guns on personal property

10 Likes

Private is private, the going on in private clubs are unspeakable

10 Likes

I’m sorry, I meant a person with his own property. I’m editing the question.

11 Likes

Changing my vote then

12 Likes

The way I see it is that all other liberties are free from discrimination at the work place? If so, so should be the 2nd

10 Likes

The way I read this is it’s about a private person restricting guns.

In their private home obviously.

As far as a business goes, if it’s open to the public there’s no real legal recourse for them to restrict guns.
Back in Commiefornia they can put out a no guns sign but it does not carry the weight of law. If they find you’ve carried in their business they can ask you to leave and you must. If they chose to trespass you they can as well. But they can do that to anyone for any reason, so it’s not really a gun thing.

14 Likes

Is there an English translator in the house?? I’m not quite understanding the question here

9 Likes

I feel it is a personal choice as to someone wanting no firearms on their own property or their personal business ,just as it is my right to not visit or patronize said places.

11 Likes

So, can I declare my home & vehicle a “No Law Enforcement or Government Agency of Any Kind Free Zone”?

  • List item
11 Likes

Seems to be working in CHAS/CHOP.

11 Likes

I feel that 2A was written to give people a means of defense and political power. Businesses should have no rights to regulate 2A in public areas.

Now, though, what about roller coasters? I might want to refuse to let guns on. Not everyone has a gun that is in drop-safe configuration, or has a holster with good enough retention.

Or what if I’m treating patients with different degrees of anesthesia? What if I’m giving therapy for schizophrenics?

For private areas, where no one else can effectively stand guard, I might not want untrusted persons to have their gun.

7 Likes

Aren’t they deemed mentally unfit for possession of a firearm already?

9 Likes

Maybe on roller coasters it’s enough just make a strong recommendation and tell you it’s your legal responsibility to control your weapon, just like at any other time. Maybe it’s also the owner’s legal responsibility to warn their customers.

5 Likes

Right, but maybe they aren’t adjudicated unfit yet. At the shrink’s office, that’s a reasonable likelihood.

5 Likes

It sounds like the biggest concern here is liability.
I can’t really respond to that aspect but I doubt I’d get on a roller coaster with a gun anyway. And if I’m in a situation where I’m getting anesthesia I’m not taking my gun for rear it won’t be there when I wake up.

8 Likes

Schizophrenia isn’t mentioned in the 2A. If I were schizophrenic we’d all be carrying.

7 Likes

In Texas, it is the legal right of a business to post a specific sign that prevents the legal carry of firearms on the premises. There is one sign for concealed carry and one for open carry. There is a separate sign that bars post saying that they make more than 51% of their revenue from alcohol and that legal carry is not permitted.
With that, a private business should be able to stipulate what they do and don’t want to allow in their place of business. I don’t think a bakery should be forced to bake cakes for same sex couples or different sex couples if they have a problem with it for some reason.
There are consequences for whatever stand you take. You should be able to decide if you want to risk alienating a portion, large or small, of you potential customers with your policies. Physical and mortal injuries aside, the government should not be able to force anyone to compromise on their principles, however misguided those principles may be.

10 Likes