Powder Coating cast bullets

This is the process I do to powder coat my cast lead bullets.


1st I place the bullets nose down in this tray I made from 1/4 aluminum.

This let’s me spray the base of the bullets with the powder


Now I have to flip the bullets to spray the nose but first this is a real important step. I take non-stick aluminum foil and cover my flip tray


Now I flip the bullets

Spray the noses

Heat the oven to 375°F

Bake the powder coated bullets for 15-20min remove and let cool

Once cool the powder coat will not stick to the foil and you have a completely coated bullet

Final step is to size the bullet then it’s ready to load

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Can full blown lead bullets be run if coated like this?

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Not sure what you are asking.

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Its bad to cast 100% lead for reloads as it will foul your barrel, correct?

Does coating eliminate the need to add tin and just cast 100% lead?

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I have fired coated bullets into a berm and inspected the Coating and it remained unchanged using scrap lead without alloying the lead

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Alloyed lead tends to produce better casting results that’s why I alloy my lead even when coated

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What is the make up of you powder paint? Where I work we have two powder paint systems and one of the ingredients in our paint is silica and we have issues with bearings and hydraulic seals wearing out prematurely from it if the maintenance department dosnt keep it cleaned up. It is like putting sand in moving parts.

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What is the purpose of coating a bullet? is it less fouling and gives more speed? i bought some federal 9mm a while back that are coated in red, i bought them cause they were available at a decent price. but only could get two boxes. but they seem heavier than other ones.

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Coated bullets eliminate leading, within reason of course. Plus it’s cheap and easy to do. It takes the place of lubing the bullet and that also leads to much less smoke. It also greatly reduces the stuff caught in the can if one is on the muzzle.

Mac82, I plan to start coating soon but I’m going to do wet coating. It just seems easier to me.

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They’re pretty!

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Bake and rebake and rebake. To many baking cycles for me on the wet process unless their is another method I’m unfamiliar with. Their is also the dry Tumble method. I tried it out didn’t work to well for me, the Coating was clumped on. I think the humidity down in Florida was too much for that method.

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I noticed @LonewolfMcQuade has a lot of pink ones.

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I can look for the makeup of the powder I use but it doesn’t appear abrasive at all.

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I can see them adding to muzzle velocity as they probably are slicker and less to stick to grooves in barrel.

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@BrianK explained it pretty well. For increased speed one can use Moly Coat this was once the new thing then died off. Most didn’t find any performance gains.


You can buy Moly Coat and apply it this is some from Sierra bullets

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For my purposes is all about reducing leading and reduced fouling.

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Like these pink 9mm?

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Off to church check with y’all later

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Yes there is the repeated coating and baking issue. Twice should do it. Nothing’s perfect.

Mac, have you tried adding this to the coating?

One youtube commando stated that he did, but I don’t see the need. But my mind isn’t closed.

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I have coated regular bullets with Hbn, used it as a bore treatment as well. It worked great if making your bore easy to clean is the goal. No chrono so don’t know if it mattered there but I didn’t see any real increase in accuracy with the rifle. DO NOT spill the crap…

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