Primers

One burns hotter than the other.

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When I had just a 45, I used regular primers, after getting the Mrs her 357 mag, I had to get small primers. I Then converted all my 45 cases to small primer Blazer cases. I use only magnum primers, and they work just fine. If you are build hot loads, remember the primer effects over all pressure.

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Things to consider about that…
Yes, Hotter primer =faster burn but it also bumps the pill harder and along with the faster burn gets the pill moving just a little faster before it meets the resistance of the rifling and can actually reduce the pressure over the burn. That’s why magnum powders need a full charge and a hot primer or the slower burn and slower moving pill will spike the pressure to unsafe levels. Undercharged rifle loads have been known to grenade the receiver or so I’ve heard.
That’s why it is so important to stick with published loads as precisely as possible and deviate in very small increments. Or have the video camera running at least!

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I’ve tried magnum primers in the past with hard to ignite powders but didn’t find that they worked any better than a standard primer. But I increased the bullet pull as much as possible to get the fire going.

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Squib loads (under powered) will either bulge the barrel OR
The round will stop and the barrel, and the next one fudge packs the stuck on in the barrel, then you have pieces of a rifle.

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:thinking: Might want to reconsider wherever you been “holstering” your weapons.

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:rofl:

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There are some terms brought up in the last few posts that I don’t know. “Magnum powders”.
“Hard to ignite powders” “bullet pull”
All good info but help me to understand what you are talking about. For me, I just plan to use the data from the book and not experiment.

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Hence the roll crimp on magnum pistol cartridges.

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Magnum powders burn slow. They have a lower chamber pressure upon ignition and need a heavy crimp on the bullet to hold it in place until the round develops a higher pressure to cause the powder to combust more efficiently.

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Some powders have a deterrent coating on them, WW296 is one, and that makes it hard to ignite. Increasing the tension that holds the bullet in the case longer helps it burn better.

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So many variables
Neck tension being a big one.
Its possible to overcrimp and loose neck tension by ballooning the brass to the detriment of consistency.
My 454 revolver will pull bullets apart, bullets moving forward enough to tie up the action if overcrimped or undercrimped.
On my magnum expanders I polish off a couple thousanths
for heavy jacketed pills. Have different expanders leave full size for lead.
Fine balance powder, primer, neck, and crimp.

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