Protect Those Ears!

What hearing pro do you guys use on the range? Does anyone else besides me use some type of hearing pro for hunting?

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why now that you mention it


so pick your favour.

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My current fav…I love the sound amplification for range conversations as well as hunting and tactical training.

Walker’s Razor Slim Electronic Muff

Walker's Razor Slim Electronic Muff, Black

Fans of contemporary electronics will appreciate the Walker’s Razor Slim Electronic Muff ultra-sleek design, among the most lightweight and slim-fitting options available with a noise reduction rating of 23 dB and dynamic range HD speakers.

Built for comfort and convenience without compromising on hearing protection, the Razor incorporates sound activated compression, omnidirectional microphones, and fast 0.2 second response time to safeguard hearing in both indoor and outdoor environments, without the interference of buky alternatives.

Along with its ultra-slim profile, Walker’s Razor Slim Electronic Muff features a convenient fold-away design for easy storage.

Bottom Line

Walker’s Razor Slim Electronic Muff features an ultra-sleek profile and rubberized, razor-thin ear cuffs that don’t compromise on protection—with a noise reduction rating of 23 dB and ultra-quick 0.02-second response time.

Among verified buyers, Walker’s Razor Slim Electronic Muff receives five-star ratings for its non-interfering low profile design, long battery life, and consistent voice amplification.

Check Price On Amazon >>>

​Key Features

  • Slim profile with ultra-thin rubberized cups
  • Two omnidirectional microphones
  • 23 dB noise reduction rating
    Blocks sound over 89 dB with 0.02 reaction time
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I have a set of the Walker slims and they work well so far (after 2 years anyway). They replaced a set of Dillon electronic muffs that I had for over a decade.

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Here is a simple explanation of noise cancelling ear protection. There are two basic types: active, which use physics to reduce the loud noises, and passive, which is what @CloverTac described.

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I use a Walker in-ear active noise cancelling ear pro. I bought mine locally but here is a link to Midway.


The good: They are rechargable with a standard micro USB cable. They have volume buttons.
The not as good: They are not Bluetooth compatible however. The cord on them is a little too short for my liking as well. They do not hang around my neck very well when not inserted in ears.
I would recommend these for a not too expensive set of active noise cancelling ear protection, especially for hunting when you are not going to want to have your phone or music player connected by Bluetooth.
PS I have not had them long enough to test the battery life yet. I have used them a couple of times during 3-4 hour range sessions with turning them off and on for shooting vs. checking targets.

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This is what my wife uses.


She has hearing loss (genetic and/or loud music in the 80s) and has hearing aids for everyday use. She worked in a shop that had frequent loud noises and didn’t want to risk losing more hearing. She had to talk to customers so strictly volume reduction would not work. She got one of the higher rates Bluetooth compatible, in ear, active noise cancelling headphones. She wanted them to be around the neck so that she could take them out of the ears and not lose them or risk getting damaged if she set them down.
I have not used them personally. Therefore, I cannot make a first hand recommendation. I did have to order a replacement pair. They do not hold up to a dog chewing on the ear bud.

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I use earplugs. As far as hunting, no way I’ll use ear protection. I try to pay attention to noise while hunting and extra movement to put earplugs in would not be something I would desire.

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that is why i use electonic plugs prior to getting into the woods… that way i have the super hearing to make hearing those noises you wanna hear even easier

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In an enclosed blind, I’ll take my big ear pro, the kind with the highest noise reduction rating. I think I got them at Walmart if I remember correctly. But I won’t put them on until I’m ready to shoot. I don’t rush my shot, so if the hog moves away by the time I put them on, then so be it. But I leave them off so I can hear them coming in the meantime.

Otherwise, I’ll wear some battery-powered Howard Leights. I don’t like those as much because they eat batteries and don’t have as good of a seal nor do they offer as good of a noise reduction rating.

A thread like this is good to see what other alternatives are out there since I’m always looking for something better.

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In my little pop-up blind I have the ear muffs I try to remember to put on before I shoot. Making sure the muzzle is outside the blind helps a lot. I also have a set of electronic muffs I have had for years. Not sure who actually made them they say Browning on them. Most of the time on the range I wear molded plugs.

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And yeah, at the range I usually double up with the orange little foam plugs and whatever ear muffs I have in my range bag. I suppose if I were to compete at some of the matches, it would be better to spend on some high quality electronic muffs. But most of the ones I’ve seen so far are the slim profile types with a NRR of 25 or less. I can’t seem to find any electronic ones (slim or non-slim) with a NRR of 30 or more, but I may not be looking hard enough.

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peltor TEP/EEP 100/200 with the “skullscrew” tips :wink: :wink:

and in combination with a over the ear muff you will get more protection then need especially when " The MSA Sordin Supreme family is good for a ~30 dB reduction across the spectral frequency range of pistol gunshot noise, sufficient for shooting rifle, pistol, or shotgun in an outdoor environment. With earplugs, they’re good for at least 40 dB of reduction, more than sufficient for all-day sessions at indoor ranges." And I would paint the Comtac with the same brush.

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