Revolver Cylinder Trouble

So, my Gunbroker model 17 can be manually rotated out of battery, clockwise, quite easily on one of the notches. Seems like the cylinder stop barely engages. I took it apart. The cylinder stop spring is good. I applied some prussian blue into the notch and it appears that the stop is making good contact with the notch. Suggestions?

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Likely some smart @sixguns.com guys that can help, and why no pics?

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Well, a picture would only reveal a normal looking cylinder stop notch, I think. If I had the skills to upload a video to show what’s happening it would be much more informative.

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Might also reveal what a Gunbroker model 17 looks like too :grin:

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This is it. I think I posted it in the " name that gun" thread shortly after I acquired it.
I’m having a little buyer’s remorse.

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@58marine
Okay, you see that ring on the cylinder ?? The timing is off in that gun that spur should not crop back up till near the beveled section of the stop notch. It needs timed.it should pull down away from the cylinder while the hammer is being pulled back and then at full lock should be engaged in the notch for firing to commence. Have you looked at the forcing cone. Is there any shavings from bullets after firing rounds? Is the Forcing cones still smooth inside and even all the way around on the lip ? If either there is shavings or the forcing cone is showing wear its a sign that the cylinder is also out of time and the bullets are just slightly off before hitting the forcing cone.

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Older Smiths, like older guys can be cranky and odd. I Had a Smith that did the same thing, and what you have there is a classic case of worn lockwork. Some of those parts are truly tiny, and can only be fitted by trained armorers with any degree of success. Depending on the year of the gun, and your qualities of persuasion, you might get the factory to take a look at it. Who knows, they may even help you out. I sure as heck would not keep shooting it.
If you are familiar with the kind of edges and angles you need, and the sort of fit required, you can try to find the parts and do the work yourself. This should only be done if you have a thorough understanding-for obvious reasons.
Other than this you can try to go back to the seller.
I don’t know of any active, qualified people outside of the factory that can help.
I wish I could be more helpful.
Best.

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Well, timing? seems to be good. When it’s cocked the stop goes right into the cylinder notch. The cylinder can not be advanced, manually, counter clockwise. Shoots good. Accuracy as expected. No shaving that I can observe. All my Smiths have a ring around the cylinder. This one seems to have a more pronounced ring. Guessing it’s had alot of rounds through it. When cocked, the hand appears to keep it in battery. When the trigger is released after firing and the hand drops down is when the one cylinder notch is able to go out of battery if the cylinder is manually rotated clockwise, if that makes sense. I’m pretty sure it’s been " tuned" in the past. By whom, no clue. Returning it to the seller probably isnt an option. It’s been a while since I bought it.
I really want this one to work properly. I think it would be a good training pistol for new shooters. ( I like to teach)

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If it is just one notch that the stop can get out of, like mentioned before, it could be timing, and not necessarily the hand but the corresponding area of the ratchet for that one specific position that has been altered poorly.

Or, the stop notch itself isn’t allowing the stop to drop into it deep enough. If someone put a chamfer on the stop, it could be easier to overcome the notch if the stop hasn’t gone up into it completely.

If you could take some closeups of the stop head and the notch that “goes free” when it shouldn’t it may help to see what the issue might be.

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Cylinder Lock

The offending notch.( I cleaned the corners with a scribe)

A properly functioning notch

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Why did you have to clean out the corners with a scribe? Was there something packed in there?

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A very small amount of debris. I wanted to insure that the corners were clean. Didnt make any difference.

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I would also clean the ratchet really well.

I am just thrown by the “one notch” issue. If it is the hand or the stop/lock, it would affect timing everywhere. I am not an expert though.

But “one notch” is is why I am thinking Ratchet/Cylinder.

When you get to that notch during normal operation, and twist the cylinder counter clockwise, is there a click and does the stop/lock engage it deeper?

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[quote=“Mosinvirus, post:13, topic:22844”]
When you get to that notch during normal operation, and twist the cylinder counter clockwise, is there a click and does the stop/lock engage it deeper?

No. The cylinder stop appears to engage properly. It acts like the notch has a chamfer on the trailing edge but, it looks pretty squared off.

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The cylinder stop looked like it may have a bit of a chamfer on it too. Who knows, perhaps two rolled edges are enough to cause that notch to disengage.

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That may be it.@Mosinvirus

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The drag mark does not seem to exactly line up with the center of the notch, (Actually 2 drag marks?) on the offending one. May just be camera lighting. It also looks at first observation like the stop doesn’t align as it drops into the notch. Also looks like a little crack in the cylinder, but probably just optical illusion. I would dykem the cylinder and stop, also milling on the back of the cylinder where it engages with the pawl, and run it through the paces, see where the contacts points are. Also see what can be done about forward/ back freeplay if excessive.

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Rotational freeplay varies from .004" to
006" , with an indicator touching the leading edge of 5 the notches. The offending notch moves about .008".
( measuring in degrees of travel would probably be more correct but hopefully this will be close enough)
Front to back travel is about .002".

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0.02 doesn’t seem excessive for an old gun, the 629 Smith Gunny built for me has zero, a newer factory Smith M29 I just checked was less then 0.001
I would try fitting a new stop, something that should be doable. Maybe someone sells an oversized…
Also they make shim kits for Smiths and others, well worth the investment. IIRC they were little washers different thicknesses 0.001 and up.

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I think maybe Gunny could be my new best friend ?

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