screwdriver recommendations

:crazy_face:
Silly @Robert

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Exactly. I have a 1/2" ratchet that no longer engages (1-1/4" tractor nut was too much) and It’s in the garage waiting for a place to replace. I believe Nick is on the money with Lowes having picked up the line but I haven’t tried there. Sears used to be no questions asked (used that twice in 40 years).

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Thanks for all the suggestions so far. I got a flyer n the mail today from Bass Pro with a combo Fat Wrench and reticle leveler in a set at about 1/2 off. That’s tempting. The Grace tools look good also but it seems no one is recommending them.

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I have a set of Grace center punches and they are outstanding. Not familiar with any of their other product lines though.

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I have the exact same problem with a Craftsman 1/2" drive ratchet that’s over 20 years old -rusted dually calipers won the battle, not the war. :upside_down_face: I’m going to attempt to repair the ratchet myself in lieu of trading it in for a piece of new Craftsman hot garbage.

The real problem nowadays is all Craftsman tools are absolute crap. So even if you do find Lowe’s will replace a failed item, you won’t be getting the same level of quality in return. I’ve resolved to buying old tools at swap meets when something breaks. You just can’t beat the quality of older stuff.

On a side note: where I work one of the functional areas I manage has oversight of facility tool control. We let end users buy whatever they want and then label and track the items. Anyway, one group of users bought about $5K of brand new Craftsman tools for several new tool boxes they were assembling. They ended up going through the labored process of returning everything one day after it arrived, citing major safety concerns. Of the wrenches, the edges were completely unfinished and razor sharp. You couldn’t even grip them firmly with bare hands without risk of being cut. They showed me side by side comparison of their old versus new Craftsman tools and the difference was night and day.

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The best screwdriver for any work related issue is an easy half glass of O.J. And fill to top with crystal skull vodka. You’ll likely clean the triggers you speak of twice as fast.

(Serious note, don’t ever mix alcohol and guns kids) safety first

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I could have done that a long time ago, but not any more. Now I face my triggers sober.:cowboy_hat_face:

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Those are the two sets that I have as well

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but what if

I use it for cleaning and degreasing?

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Oh, boy. This is one of my pet peeves. Gun screws (and, conversely, gunsmithing screwdrivers) are ground differently than your standard, off the shelf screwdriver sets. Every mention of non-gunsmithing screwdrivers should be ignored. DO NOT buy household screwdrivers and put them on a gun screw. EVER. I’ve got the Grace sets on the bench (my preference) and some kind of bit driver with gun specific bits in the mobile setup. They don’t cost much and a fucked up gun screw is a dead giveaway an amateur has been inside the firearm.

Also, while we’re at it, don’t put a screwdriver on Sig classic series grip screws, at all. Even gunsmithing screwdrivers. There is a special screwdriver for those and, if the screws are damaged, the warranty is void. And classic series guns aren’t cheap. So, don’t do that. If you have already done that, order new screws and the proper driver and replace them. Or, always a better option, take the work to a professional.

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I had to use a screwdriver today…Twice, I hate it when that happens.

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How so? Honestly did not know / never heard of this. What specifically is the difference?

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While steel type and hardness factors into it, the primary difference is that gunsmithing screwdrivers have hollow-ground tips. The contractor/handyman/household screwdrivers (Craftsman, etc.) are taper-ground. They’re great screwdrivers around the house, but they are not suited to gunsmithing.
If you look at the profile of a hollow-ground screwdriver, the blade is the same width for 1/8 inch or so back from the tip, then flares out rapidly to the width of the shank. A taper-ground blade has a profile that tapers from the tip to the width of the shank.
Gun screws tend to have fairly narrow, deep slots, because they frequently get torqued more than typical houshold screws. Unlike taper-ground screwdrivers, a hollow-ground screwdriver tip will fill the entire slot of the screw and not try to “walk” out when you torque it.
Bottom line: Those buggered up screwheads you see on older guns come from using taper ground screwdrivers.

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:+1: Thanks brother! Honestly never knew this was something specific to firearms.

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Sadly I agree. I have “duplicate” SK ratchets that were my Father-in-law’s and I’m using them now - as well as a bunch of Craftsman tools. When I graduated high-school in 1977 my eight-year older older brother gave me a Craftsman mechanic’s toolbox with 1/4, 3/8 and 1/2 ratchets ad sockets and a bunch of other tools. Boy, have they been a gift that keeps on giving.

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What @LonewolfMcQuade said. Sometimes, he knows what he’s talking about. Lol

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dick!! I usually do. Now, weather my thoughts & the words that come out of my mouth are on the same page, that’s a crap shoot…

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I had to double check to make sure I wasn’t still in the lies thread.

:rofl:

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Would you like me to show you another use for your screwdriver? Keep it up fucker

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You just like the deeper hollow ground drivers for picking pubic hairs out from between yer tooth. :wink:

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