Some sick SOB needs to pay 🤬

Swaping some tires/wheels from one junker to another, end up on the drivers rear and find out the lug nuts are reverse thread :face_with_symbols_over_mouth::face_with_symbols_over_mouth::face_with_symbols_over_mouth:

I had the impact crankin hot,(20v) smoke coming from the socket I ruined, finally figured it out trying to rock them loose, flippin twilight zone moment when one came half off in “reverse :thinking: :thinking:” , I need to buy a new socket tomorrow in hopes of getting the last two off, they have little “L”'s stamped on but they’re not in neon and surely not easy to read

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I would make fun, but I won’t…I will leave it Lonewolf, Joe-Bob and Belt-fed…and that dam Injun…

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Don’t think i ever seen a left hand threaded lug nut and what purpose would it serve? Not only are ya gonna need a new impact socket, yer gonna need some new studs too. Impact sockets are usually pretty tough.

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Frickin’ Lefties.

:rage::rage:

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Neither had I , I googled Dana 70 reverse lug thread and sure enough, its a thing, a stupid leftly thing

:rofl: yep, this proves it

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Also means yer gonna have to pull the axle to put the new studs in. This in a chebby or ferd?

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Dude, it HAS to be a Ford! :grin::grin::grin::grin::wink::sunglasses:

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That 88 ferd i had you didn’t have tp pop the pumpkin cover to pull the axle. that sucker eat rear axle seals like candy.

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My 63 Dodge Polaris had LH threads on the driver’s side. Snapped a stud off b4 we figured out what the little L ment. That was in 1974 or 75.

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When you encounter them, they are only on the left side of the vehicle, and the claimed purpose is to reduce the chances of the lug nuts working loose from the rotational forces applied to the lugs while driving forward.

Left handed threads on the lugs on the right side, would supposedly make them more likely to come loose (or as likely to come loose as right handed threads on the lugs on the left side).

It’s the sort of thing that engineers worry about, and create problems for mechanics to deal with as a result.

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Would be a good time to put new right hand thread studs in (unless the engineers decided to prevent this ‘accidently’ happening, by making the holes for the left hand thread studs a different size).

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I’ll just tell the new owner, this is one of the culprits

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Mopar did that in the 60s. I don’t know if they still do.

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Don’t pull the axles to replace the studs it may not be necessary. What kind of vehicle is it?

Been there done that. I know Chrysler used the left hand threads on the left side up to at least 1976.

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Redmax

I just swapped the tires, it will be leaving for Belgium soon to its new owner, who I did tell the story to, sadly had to add a few others details as well as other issues came up when doing this

I swapped the tires to this wreck hoping to sell it and not have to fix it, so far it looks like I’ll be fixing it

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Well that looks like a '78 to '84 E350 longbody 4x4 being carborated from what I could see in the video. I kike it! The rear end is not difficult to change the wheel studs on. Just pull the brake drums and knock out the studs with a hammer. Then to install the new studs you will need a few extra lug nuts and a oversized nut to slip over the new stud for installation. Put the stud through the hub. slide on the oversized nut and install a lug nut on it with the flat side to the nut and tighten it until the head on the stud is bottomed out on the hub, reinstall the drum an tire and your done. Don’t bother with the left hand treads either. This will work on almost every vehicle.

Just curious which engine 351w, 351M, 400 or 460

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84 Supercargo, only one owner who had it customized for the oil fields, 460

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My ffiiinngg Christ - it’s a van…

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Yep, I do love me some vans :innocent:

These 4x4 versions really get in your blood too, more so if diesel :drooling_face:

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