Start prepping! Electric grid ‘prime target’ of terrorists, ‘profound threat,’...


#1

Share useful survival and outdoors know-how, tools, tips, and ideas.


#2

AKA - Open Season. :joy::joy::joy:


#3

A simple ice storm can leave areas without power for two weeks. Hurricanes can leave areas without power for even longer.

100 years ago, quite a bit of the population of the US would have thought you were nuts, if you started talking about how not having electricity in homes was a major problem. Now, homes are built so that if the electricity is off, you can’t stand to be in them for more than a few minutes in the summer, and you freeze in the winter.


#4

With a camp stove, lots of candles and 12 volt lights, what’s to worry.


#5

hopefully they get all the cell towers too…then a man can finally get some peace and quiet…


#6

Ya GD right!!!


#7

Terrorists or crumbling infrastructure may get there first. Just look at the US Territory of Puerto Rico. Weren’t they without electricity for almost a year after the hurricane hit? I’m guessing they can teach us softies a thing or two how to cope, but then again they live on a tropical island with warm temperatures. Not sure how one can cope in a house not designed to withstand frigid subzero temps without electrical heat in the winter time.

When Katrina hit, my Dad, who lives in Biloxi, was without electricity for about a month, without potable water for almost a month, and without cell phone service and land lines for about six weeks. I think the Houston area fared worse after all the flooding from Harvey.

Maybe terrorists saw the damage to our grids done by hurricanes and think they can replicate it? Probably be more devastating for those living up north in the winter time.


#8

Being up here in ND (for now) I’ve often thought about how this would play out in the sub zero winters. It’d be rough if it lasted more then a week I’m thinking.


#9

Alternative heat sources should be high on your to do list.
Wood and propane store well.
Funeral pyre in the front lawn for looters could be a source too. :smiley:


#10

Agreed! Keeping warm would be a top priority.


#11

When the power is off in the winter, you need to keep yourself warm, your water supply pipes warm, and your drain pipes warm.

Last time I had to deal with a frozen pipe, I had gotten up in the morning to find a sink nearly full of water. I had left the faucet dripping, as extra insurance on a really cold night, but it turned out the drain line was the most vulnerable pipe to freezing. Spent some time under the house, that day. :tired_face:


#12

In that area in winter I would have a plan to move South…


#13

Oh,I’m going south alright…South Korea! Lol -3 right now projected -10* by 10:00 am as we speak. You don’t wanna know the “real feel” temp. Be there in about a month. The pain is finding a sitter for the pew,pews. But I have met some good people out here though. They voted out Ol’ Heitkamp for hell’s sake.


#14

I think on this quite a bit really. I still have kerosene lamps, heaters, propane stoves, plenty of tanks…
Once I move I will be set up in a much more mild climate too.
Hard times makes for hard people. We are so soft now I do not think many people would really know what to do. I grew up in a 100 year old house with no insulation… the fire place was the heat source. Firewood warms you twice, once when you cut it and again when you burn it. Now there are so many restrictions I am not sure if you can actually install one any more.
My friend had a pellet stove… worked well… but you have to have pellets and at least a 12 volt battery… better have a way of keeping that battery charged too!


#15

I grew up on an island… we would go weeks without power during the winter. For 30 years now I have always had a generator with 15 gallons of fuel for backup. Just enough run time planned during the day to keep the food cold and the fish tanks warm. Hahhaha


#16

Here in washingrad we call it a target rich environment.