Steering wheel vibration/shake - balancing?

First thing that came to mind, look for any slight bulges on the sidewalls.

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The issue is in the rear. Or the drive shaft. I can’t do it over the internet for them.

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Thank you all. I will continue to investigate and replace the tires soon.

Will update when I get more info.

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And I’d like to see those old tires used as raised garden beds for your newly remodeled home :grin:

And no avocado trees, too much water :grin:

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I had the same problem on my Challenger. The vibration only happened over 80 (speed limit is 75 most places but 85 in some areas). It got better with balancing and rotation but never went away until I changed tires.

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Are you sure it’s not just caused by an illegal alien hanging on to the undercarriage?

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Back in the 70’s I had a set of front tires that shook at 2 different speeds. Turned out they were not exactly round. Something else to check.

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Tire engineers and their representatives have often said (when it comes up) you can’t drive a tire with belt separation, and it is common myth. Belts separate, but it is visible in that the tire isn’t round. It will have a flatter part and be bulged there.

Not confuse air behind the tubeless liner causing a small pocket on the sidewall.

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I’ve had a ton of experience working side by side with engineers. I’ll just say that engineers spend a whole lot of time sitting in offices, working on computers and dealing with theories, and I’ve spent years fixing things that were their “next best idea.”
I don’t know what an engineer considers a “myth” but I know you can damage, break, or separate radial belts and have actually seen the insides of tires that were coming apart in “strings” that looked suspiciously like belts to me… but I’m just a stupid wrench turner, not a genius engineer, so what do I know?

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Most people wouldn’t have the slightest clue what to do with the info anyway. ‘Oh, it’s a bad O2 sensor code…I’ll just change that’, only it is actually a failing fuel pump or clogged filter or stuck injector or vacuum leak or bad pressure regulator…on and on and on. Codes only tell you if a sensors output is outside of accepted parameters. NOT what’s actually causing the output to be off.

Sometimes there isn’t even a code. Late 80’s-early 90’s Fords had an extremely common idle issue. It was caused by a bad TPS but not a single code was thrown. The TPS would fail in such a manner it signaled the computer you were applying some throttle when you weren’t, resulting in the computer deactivating the IAC(idle air control motor) and the engine surging/dying at idle. I argued with guys ad nauseam on Mustang forums who swore it wasn’t the TPS because there was ‘no code’. To the man, every single one admitted defeat after days spent changing gaskets looking for a non-existent vacuum or fuel leak.

Computers and codes aren’t the ‘be all/end all’ of diagnostics. They’re barely a starting point in most cases.

Oh how I loathed IH having us come in so they could explain how the engineers ‘designed’ things to be done.

“Hey, I got an idea Brad. How about putting the injector drive module somewhere that’s NOT guaranteed to collect water IN THE FIRST F*$#ING PLACE?”.

“Hey Brad, instead of having us SimpleGreen/Powerwash the intercooler every 30 days to remove built up blow-by and road grime, why not side mount it IN THE FIRST F*$#ING PLACE?”

Definitely sounds like a tire issue. You noted the issue has been reduced since having the tires re-balanced but didn’t say how much weight they used to do it or where the weights were put. A lot of tire shops, in the name of expedience, simply keep slapping weights on until the machine says the tire is balanced. Breaking the bead and rotating the tire 90-180 degrees is often needed to minimize the number of weights added. Another issue is many will only apply weights to the inside edge or offset for a cleaner look. Good old fashion ‘hammer on’ wheel weights applied to both beads as needed is the BEST way to balance a tire for higher speeds. I’ve taken tires, balanced that way on a simple highspeed balancer, well into triple digits without issue.

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This, times 10,000:

Absolutely positively the truth…

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Some time back, ‘engine monitoring systems’ became the new fad with quite a few owners of private planes. They have had some elaborate online (and offline) discussions of the virtues of how having realtime data on the EGT and CHT of each cylinder, along with digital fuel flow, allows them to manage their fuel consumption and reduce their cost of flying.

And the follow up to that, is that I’ve seen an increase in engine wear and expensive engine repairs, with the engines showing signs that they were run lean for extended periods.

Something missing from their discussions, is that the digital systems are (in most cases), a modification that is added to private planes, installed by a mechanic ‘in the field’. The installation instructions do include the dimensional criteria for installing the probes, but since the kits are a ‘one kit fits several’ item, there is a dimensional allowance to make things fit. If the installer takes the attitude that he is given a dimensional range, and therefore only has to make sure that all of the probes are somewhere inside that range (ignoring the issue of matching the dimensions for each probe on that specific installation), the accuracy of the readings from that system is not going to be consistent, and will effectively be providing questionable data. …but the owner will treat those systems as information handed down by god, rather than question whether or not they wasted their money by buying the system, then having it installed by the shop that gave them the lowest quote on the install labor.

Yeah, there is a downside to providing an operator with information that they only think they can understand.

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Goes right back to GIGO…same as with the aforementioned TPS issue. Computers are basically stupid in the aspect that they will operate with only the information they are given, and as long as that information fits within certain parameters, it considers that to be sufficient to operate the system. If any part of the initial programming is bad as well as parameters that are out of range of the specific system (as opposed to a generalization of multiple systems, as mentioned) then everything can go to hell pretty quickly.

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sounds a lot like the covid model that shut down the world.

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Too true!
That and real, genuine stupidity along with some intentional malice I strongly suspect.

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The same thing happened to my Cherokee. The TPS was starting to fail, so I was experiencing a rough idle and surging. At first, no code was generated because the TPS was still functioning (barely) within the computer code parameters. It didn’t throw the code until the TPS was failing bad enough.

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Yeah, it was also an issue(though not as common) on the Jeep/Dodge FI systems. My 5.9 Limited ZJ suffered from it. In fact I managed to knock a few bucks off the purchase price because the owner thought it was something worse.

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If I recollect correctly, there is a recall on the U-joints on the Tacoma. That might be part of the problem.

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Thinks were so much simpler back then

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Ah yes! Those were the days!
I remember how simple diesels used to be back before they got all effed up with computerized garbage.
Amazing to think that the only three things you need to run a diesel is fuel, air and compression. If you can start spinning it while adding fuel and air, you can make it run…absolutely no electricity required.
Amazing how badly we can jack things up with technology.

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