Suppressors, the ins and outs

So if you know us you know we support the sale and use of suppressors.
We have a business relationship with Rex Silentium and have had years of getting to know the owner and coming up with special projects etc…
Their new 9mm and 45 pistol can is RAD… check it out.
Best part? $449.00 MSRP (double check on that) hhahaaa

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I am at almost a year waiting on 2 Suppressor Stamps…at this point if I ever get them I am done with ever buying anymore unless all the demoRats get deported…

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Don’t despair. I said the exact same thing after waiting 50 weeks for my first stamp… the next two came in a little over half that time. And the two after that, and after that. So on and so forth.

Bottom line is the wait gets a whole lot easier when you’ve already got something out of jail at home to play with.

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The Silentium looks kick ass! :metal:

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Dittos what spook wrote. I think the key is to just forget about the stamps and one day you’ll get a surprise in the mail. Basically that’s what I do; apply, then just forget about it. Fretting doesn’t hurry them along.

It’s time for ATF to add more people yet again to shorten the wait times. They’ve done that 3 times that I know of and each time they get swamped by the ever increasing volume of tax stamps.

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I bought 2 Suppressors in 2011 and it was roughly 9 months…did a SBR in 2014 and it was 3 months…current 2 Suppressors like I posted has been right at one year…it’s getting longer…

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We are finding that the wait times are all over the place. 14 months, 9 months… zero rhyme or reason to it.
Taxation is THEFT

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^^^^This

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Don’t forget 2 and 3 months and some have waited 2 weeks and got back 5-10 stamps. As you said no rhyme or reason! It’s the gubbament we are working with lol

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Been since February when I mailed it all in. Another guy sent his in a month before January and got his last month October. Oh Please Be This Month! I’ve been real good honest.

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Can I apply for a stamp but then build my own or do I have to have plans drawn up first to apply for the stamp? What’s the short and ugly explanation if anyone knows ?

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Before having stamp in hand you can draw up all the plans you want (or buy them), heck, you can even discuss it as we are now or look at videos regarding builds. You can buy the stock too. But the stamp comes first before putting a cutter to metal to make can parts. If it looks like a can part assume you’d be illegal. But raw materials, no problem. You might need to know some things, like caliber, unsure there, but you’ll need the serial number and that can’t change. Once you get the stamp in hand you can make the parts, but no extras, and not before having stamp in hand. Better to be safe than sorry when it comes to this stuff. Too, there’s a great deal of BS floating around regarding this subject. I recently had a “discussion” with a video poster regarding the Dead Air Ghost-M can and it’s rubber wipe at the end of the can. He stated that it HAD to be returned to DA for replacement, maybe he included a local manufacturer, IDK (a local mfgr is OK if they have the wipes). But the part where we disagreed was the owner of the can disposing of the spent wipe then making a replacement and having one and only one on hand. I have yet to post the letter from ATF, and a pictorial instruction on how to make them, but I was correct. The ATF letter is extremely explicit and the video poster would have had owners under more severe restrictions than even ATF requires. We don’t need that crap, it’s tough enough as it is.

If you ever have questions, and you still should, don’t take my word for anything or anyone elses, check with ATF. They aren’t there to burn you, they are there to make sure of compliance. If you ask them questions about making a can it shouldn’t start with, “I made this…”. That would be exactly the reverse of everything that I just wrote. FWIW, when asking be patient when awaiting the answer. It took over a week for them to get back to me with my question. Too, be very explicit about what you want to know, I include questions whose answers I don’t necessarily need, and don’t assume that they can read your mind or what you actually mean to ask.

OK, the reason I mentioned raw materials… I have a sheet of suitable rubber that can make hundreds of end wipes for my Ghost-M. I have a 6 ton press and a 1 3/16" arch punch, and the tools fabricated to center punch different size holes in the rubber disks. The gear and materials are OK to own. But I can only have one rubber end wipe on hand for the can at any one time. If I want to punch one out for .22, I destroy (melt, burn, or cut into at least 4 pieces) the existing one then I’m free to make the one I want with the proper center hole, but only one. Again, as long as I only have one on hand I’m good. That why after you have your stamp in hand you make only what gets used in your can and no more.

But check with ATF to make sure. I can’t/won’t give legal advice. “Hey, this guy on the internet said…”, is no defense. It’s much better to have a letter in hand than to guess and see a major fine, legal expenses, and jail time.

Even after having their letter in answer to any questions, but yours should be straight forward, determinations can change. Not long ago it was OK to have multiple wipes on hand. That was SOP for 20 years. Then ATF changed it’s mind and they went to the one only determination that I wrote about. They also recently changed the definition of machine gun to make bump stocks illegal. But for a can, once it’s made you should be good for a very long time. OK, I’m going to write it again, check with ATF to answer your questions. There are reputable sources on the internet that can also give the info you need, but after that it comes down to ATF. Don’t get info from videos or just anyone, and that includes myself. That’s why when I post what I intend to regarding the manufacture of rubber end wipes for my specific can I will lead with the letter from ATF.

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Short and ugly:

I’ve never built a suppressor myself, but my understanding is you don’t need to submit plans or anything, just the Form 1 as usual. The biggest hang up is you cannot build or assemble (or in some instances like an SBR where nothing needs machined, even be in possession of) all the parts until after you’ve received your stamp.

Lastly, some of this dialogue may be of interest.

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No plans needed. Just fill out the Form 1(do the EForm, it’s WAY faster) with a model designation(make one up)/serial number(you make up your own)/length/caliber. If you screw up end cap threads and need to shorten the tube for new ones, just notify ATF and they will change the records.

DO NOT CUT ANYTHING until you have your approved tax stamp in hand. Good news? EForm 1’s are regularly being processed in under 30 days at the moment.

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Thank you all very much! I will look into the e form after some family expenses get taken care of. I would love to have 4 cans eventually but don’t even have the threaded barrel for the 9 yet

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Bear in mind that you can use a smaller caliber in a given can. My Ghost-M is a .45 can. I regularly shoot 9mm and .22 rimfire in it. I make the rubber wipes to fit what I’m shooting and that makes it work. OK, the can also comes apart for cleaning otherwise I wouldn’t use it for .22.

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So diameter wise a 9 mm would be ok for .308 ,5.56, and.22 . I’m guessing the .308 and .556 would have more umph behind it so I’m not sure what to do about that.

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Sorry Festus, I intended to reply to you, maybe using your user name will alert you.

As long as the can is rated for the pressure it’ll handle calibers smaller than it’s intended for. A handgun can isn’t going to last long or at all with rifle cartridge pressure hitting it. But a rifle can, as long as the hole in the end is larger than the bullet, will handle it fine, but there’s more.

Take my Ghost-M. It’s a handgun can so it’ll handle any caliber smaller than .45 as long as it’s a relatively low pressure cartridge (handgun). It’s also specifically rated for subsonic .300 BLK. But supersonic .300 BLK, no. With the dirty stuff, like .22 rimfire you must be able to take the can apart for cleaning and the Ghost-M does come apart for cleaning. I’d also want to be able to take it apart after firing lots of lead bullets since they’d be as dirty as .22 rimfire.

My Amtac CQB-M is a .30 caliber rifle can. But I have it on a .223 . It works fine on it. It handles the pressure, but it loses some efficiency making it louder than it should be than if it was on a .30. If I shot .22 rimfire through it everything would work fine for a time. But since I can’t take it apart for cleaning eventually something would happen and it wouldn’t be for the better. But I should be able to load subsonic copper jacketed .223s and shoot it through the CQB-M with no ill effects. I do that now with another can that is a .223/5.56 specific can that doesn’t disassemble.

:smiley: I hope that makes sense. Does it?

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That makes perfect sense, thank you very much. Based on the pressure I should probably have a can I use for .308 and .223 and a separate one for 9mm and .22 since the former are rifle and the latter are pistol . Budget wise I am very limited right now so It is going to take quite a while to accomplish either. If I get the stamp to make my own I will need to educate myself about pressures first.

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