Teen arrested for threat on game

I wouldn’t go as far as comparing this kid with a mass shooter. But I would say he should be investigated and maybe pushed or forced to undergo counseling, but definitely not locked up like a criminal.

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accept a 15 year old is not a “little kid” and the mother should have been dragged away for coddling the little bastard, but than again every mass murderer had parents that loved them

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When you were 15 you never said anything you didn’t mean??? Yeah right

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but I didn’t tell a million people when I did.
But as what the arresting officer said - what would have happened if we treated it as “boys will be boys” and he did carry out his threat.
As police services start becoming more proactive in these occurrences the verbal displaying “pseudocommondo” will go incognito and the only warnings will be when it happens. And we will hear the same excuses " my child would never do that" and " they were such nice children ".

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As a parent myself I expect my kids to say things they don’t mean. I also expect consequences but an arrest with felony consequences for speech is wrong.

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Long winded reply coming.

Don’t yell fire in a movie theatre right? Yea, we don’t REALLY have free speech do we…?

This sort of falls in line with what I’ve been saying. Our rights are an all or nothing sort of thing. Either we allow everything or we (eventually) get nothing. What should of happened is the kid should of been monitored, questioned and in the end received counseling instead of arrested and charged which basically ruins his life (no rehabilitation is possible now). While I do not know his mental state I can guess by the overly dismissive “coddling” mother and his participation in online multiplayer games as a minor that he is likely without social skills, common sense and a sense of consequence from one’s actions more so than your average teenager. I also will guess he is also likely to be a poor student with a lack of focus.

In my opinion this would of been a great situation to practice identifying and treating mental illness or in this case a mental deficiency–because in the end NO teenager would say something of THIS magnitude. Teens say stupid stuff, and we all know we did as teens, he shouldn’t of been arrested immediately but detained while they go through those aforementioned steps mentioned which is a win all around. An option in this case, would be the teen’s parent could refuse those actions (because the mother would likely do so) and not allowed law enforcement to have a qualified independent mental health doctor to assess the teen’s mental state and propensity for violence. And the result in the refusal is in this case both the teen and parent(s) arrested if the DA sees fit to do so.

That’s the only reasonable solution here, participate in identifying and healing the mentally unstable or arrest the non-compliant individual who refuses. Using my method mentioned above would be the most efficient way to identify true threats, get people the mental counseling / treatment if needed and also identify who is not a threat. This saves people criminal proceedings, money and incidents on their criminal records and does its best to protect speech more so than what is going on now. Also, I’m all for treating people instead of jailing them (which also includes narcotic users but I digress) because that’s the more humane and right thing to do. It is easier to rehabilitate someone who can be treated never jailed and released as opposed to throwing them in prison’s genpop and “hoping” there’s not recidivism in the future for these individuals. Unfortunately there’s a strong chance recidivism happens so that’s bad.

So unfortunately in this case the law enforcement, DA’s office, the state and the private prison system benefits from this teen’s arrest and forthcoming court date where he will already be found guilty because of the feels by “his peers” on the jury thus putting another person in the system. Seems like a lot of people benefit from arresting and jailing people… Hmmm…funny how that works out eh? :thinking:

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What happened to Madonna when she said live, with a microphone and tv cameras that she wanted to blow up the white house?

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why - his statement is not covered under the first amendment - his statement is a call to action. But he has been charged - but not convicted yet.
pretty well every premorbid occurrence the killer has in fact issued warnings either through direct threats or by their passive aggressive actions.

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the direct quote is “I thought about blowing up the Whitehouse” which can fall under the protection of 1st compared to “I will take my fathers M15 and shoot 7 people”

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So, if some kid were on social media and said “I have thought an aweful lot about blowing up my school” or “I have thought an aweful lot about shooting up my school” , then that’s ok? FBI wouldn’t be at that kids door?

Seems, in saving the Second Amendment, we are sacrificing the First. What words are allowable when venting? Thought? Dreamed? Wish? Want?

I know that many of the mass murderers did write on social media their desires or plans before the event took place, and no one reported it. Well, now its being reported, which I have to say is good. But it just brings about a whole new set of problems as to proving intent, a legit threat, freedom of speech, etc.

It’s a tough situation.

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Check out my edited post above. :+1:

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pretty sure after that comment of Ms.Madonna Louise Ciccone that certain aspect of law enforcement did take a very close look at her.

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Murder, Rape, and saying stupid shit

image

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No, we don’t. We will surely end up like the UK soon.
As much as I hope for a successful SpaceX launch, I do WISH that the returning booster would land on my neighbors house…while they are home. Is that a threat? No. It’s not mental illness either. It’s just wishing karma would work a little faster, that’s all. And possibly revealing that I have a bit of a morbid side. Hey, I’m only human. I think many people have said something similar about their bosses or possibly in-laws.

If they throw this kid in jail, he’ll only be surrounded by other troubled kids and probably come out worse than when he went in.
They keep talking about mental illness, but don’t seem to be interested in treating these kids for mental illness? Is stupidity a mental illness?
Why jail? You don’t get help in jail. You just get better schooled in the art of crime. If these kids knew the value of a dollar, they would realized what their parents are fixing to go through in legal fees to try and save their sorry asses.
But, you also have what @srdiver said, eventually kids will learn not to give a warning or post on social media. Keeping someone from saying something outloud doesn’t keep them from thinking it, nor acting on it.

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Yes. Because stupidity is the result of some other cause. You are just stupid, you are stupid because

I wonder what the father in all of this had to say? I’m suspecting he never taught his boy anything and he and his wife left the kid to be raised by electronics.

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by her verbal cues and what She says - single parent and there is no father in the picture.

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I assumed so, but the kid did mention his father’s rifle. Perhaps he was just bloviating.

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I don’t think for a minute this kid is mentally ill. Or even stupid (as in not intelligent.) I would bet, again based on the mothers response, that this kid, like so many these days, never suffered consequences for their speech or actions.

When I was pretty young, (7 or so) I learned the ‘F’ word on the playground. I had no understanding of it’s meaning or that it was a bad word. I just knew someone used it when they were mad. Not aggressively toward someone else, just as a angry response to something he did.
Later that very same day, I used the word at home in front of my mom. (Didn’t have a dad at the time.) I don’t recall what I did that prompted me to use my newly expanded vocabulary. But what I do recall is the unpleasant taste of a bar of Ivory Soap. I don’t think I ever cussed in front of my parents again.

Kids need to be taught there is a consequence to their actions. But so frequently these days we don’t see any consequence at all. We see parents coddling their kids and even sticking up for their bad behaviour. An example of mine is when I got a bad grade in school. I’m not talking about not getting straight A’s, I talking about the occasional D. When I got that grade I lost some allowance that I still had to do chores for, or maybe grounded and my homework monitored. What I didn’t have is a parent writing or visiting the teaches to push them to change the unfair grade.

These freedoms we talk about are protections from government. So should this kid be arrested? No, I don’t think so. Should his parent(s) be holding him accountable? Damn straight. This also builds respect. For their parents and for the rest of civil society. But this mom seems ill equipped for that.

So a question for debate.
When children, commit some crime, (specifically a violent crime) should the parents be held accountable?

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In this instance my opinion is any kid that makes that sort of statement about shooting up a school has some kind of mental deficiency, maybe not technically an illness but definitely a mental deficiency. Regardless of causes, and I agree with what you’re saying and think the parents are most likely the largest cause, I believe the kid still has a mental deficiency of some kind. Especially now with how prevalent media is he would of seen repeatedly the stories of the school killings so he must of known this is a hot topic. Was it stupid of him to say, yea, I still think even a “normal” kid wouldn’t of made some remark like that.

^ Agree 100%

^ Again, agree 100%.

Yes. I would call it child neglect at the minimum. Perhaps a LARGE amount of community service FOR THE WHOLE HOUSEHOLD and mandatory therapy for the child (with no meds!!!).

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I guess my reluctance at calling this a mental issue is, it seems to me, as providing an excuse for his actions. But I get what you’re saying.

(Still think it’s actually the radio waves.)

tinfoil

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