Thinking about painting my next rifle.

Anyone got a any good examples of decent paint jobs? Im talking rattle can stuff here not artwork. I’ve only painted a few and they were not very good.

Here’s a video on it for anybody whos never attempted it.

Also do not follow the advice in the comments section of this guys video, especially where it says:

“A good way to paint around your serial number is to grind it off”

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When you said that it didn’t turn out good what do you mean
How much time did you spend degreasing and de gassing

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For one it phaded really fast. Then it just looked very bubba with blotches in parts. I think I could’ve prepped them better, tbh.

What’s your process for prepping a rifle to be rattle canned?

What paint do you use?

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Disassemble completely and degrease
Acetone or simple green your choice
Clean and clean and then clean more
And when you think your degreased enough
Degrease again
I like to de gas the pieces in the oven for a bit before actual application

I like alumahyde from brownells or even duracoat in the can
But if your looking for the cheap
Krylon fusion works great on plastics and metals
Or a high heat engine paint works just as well
You can cure the parts in your oven after they dry
Then hang em for a week and forget about them

I forgot to add appliance epoxy paint works great as well

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colors
bone

You can also just hang it in the basement and squirt it with some discount paint. Works surprisingly well.

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Are those yours?

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Nah, just some ideas. Why be boring?!

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Acetone is a fantastic solvent. It works great, leaves no residue, and evaporates instantly.

That 1200 degree wood stove paint is another good option to consider. I have also seen a similar product for exhaust manifolds.

All paints need time to fully cure. A week is a good recommendation.

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Yes, engine block paint is a good option, if you don’t want to squirrel around with the fancy stuff.

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have you not been paying any attention to Rogue?

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He cerakotes and does custom artwork, that’s a whole other level to what im talking about.

I was asking for tips on doing decent rattle can paint jobs. Its like going to a Ferrari dealer to ask about Hondas.

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Here are a couple in camo. I tend to start with some kind of grill work or netting, then I go over that with a natural sponge that I’ve wet with paint. I think random, chaotic, and rather high contrast patterns do the best at breaking up outlines. But, it all depends upon your environment.

You can also buy some strong/thick elastic cordage and tie various colors of yarn to it. Then, wrap it around the rifle, being careful not to obscure your optic. I find that such three dimensional camo is really the most effective. Neutral color zip-ties can be used to attach actual foliage from your specific area quickly and easily.

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I’ve had a couple factory painted guns, where they were handled and carried on sling that rubbed against my coveralls the paint wore off. I agree they look neat but I don’t have any wall hangers, cerakote and powdercoating is the way to go for long lasting color. granted it’s not as cheap, but if the paint rubs off in a short period of time it wasn’t worth the effort to make it look good. just my opinion with what I have seen.

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Here’s one I did years ago with that Krylon Camo stuff. I’ve hauled this all over the place and hunted with it. It’s still holding up well. It’s subtle, but I like it. Used to have the barrel and action camouflaged too but decided to strip it back to the stainless and leave the stock.

I used a palm leaf for the pattern btw.

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