What would still work after an EMP attack?


#1

#2

everything
considering the earth is subjected to more than 50,000 EMP strikes every minute.
it is the reason militaries no longer “harden” their equipment.


#3

My Humvee will work


#4

So will all my 1-4 power scopes. Hahahhahaa


#5

Millennials still won’t work…


#6

:joy::rofl:


#7

Horses and bicycles.
Spears and bows.
Old cars without electronics.
Gravity power.
And guns of course.
Can’t have a post apocalyptic scenario without guns.
Is it really true, about the constant emp strikes to our planet?
Didn’t know that.


#8

F-E350 IDI


#9

Here’s another opinion:

Modern diesel trucks have a lot of electronics.
The transmissions have computers, the brakes and many other components are also full of electronics.
Communications, too, and so many other things we take for granted without a thought.


#10

the power required to be effective beyound a localized event wouldn’t matter because there wouldn’t be any survivors due to the blast energy.
Like I said the Earth suffers more than 50000 EMP strikes a minute, and experts equal funding and research.


#11

so you believe the electromagnetic pulse that can be dispersed in a warhead if detonated above large cities would be powerful enough to kill everyone below, not just fry circuitry?


#12

yes

case in point

short range tactic nucs - no one was worried about the pulse because anyone close enough to be affected was most likely dead because of the blast (not radiation). Think of it as a stone thrown in a puddle with the radiating wave - as it gets further from the source it diminishes in strength and power. Lightning generates EMPs - consider that amount of energy above you or around you. Even modern cars have survived direct strikes, with the car still being able to work afterwards (maybe not well). Now consider how much magic you need to disable say parking lot full of cars.


#13

Of greater concern should be solar flares in the X+ Class.

However, I’ve seen some interesting information on EMP generators that could be used in city centers.

I think the real concern with either of these would be more of the effect on the power grid vs cars etc.
Take out the power grid and you take out almost everything anyway. Can’t pump gas or water, can’t ship anything that needs to travel via a vehicle that needs fuel, refrigeration goes down, food spoils, some meds spoil etc. Almost everything of importance is computer controlled often via the internet. Internet runs much of the grid, and the internet needs power to run the computers. Domino effect.
So along with EMP, a virus introduced into the grid that effectively shuts it down would have the same effect, and one might argue it would be easier to pull off.


#14

Good points…


#15

One other note about EMP effects on vehicles:
Most computer controlled vehicles that were either not being operated, or were in any kind of area that provides some type of shielding from EMP (underground parking structure etc) would still be fully operational post EMP.


#16

Our Power Grid is surprisingly vulnerable. There are about 2000 step up transformers/substations in the US. They are all built overseas and take 1-2 years to build in good circumstances. A coordinated attack on just 9 or 10 substations would take down the entire grid for years. The cascade effect would be disastrous.

Watch this:

When you get back from cleaning yourself up, read this
https://securethegrid.com/vulnerability/


#17

From reports I’ve seen, desolate power stations have little to no security whatsoever! Even after repeated warnings, not much has been done.


#18

True, and we’ve had a couple of really close wake-up calls, but nobody’s waking up.
The “security” at even the more critical locations is often a joke.


#19

Almost as if inviting an incident to take place!!!


#20

[quote=“EQuinn, post:16, topic:8289, full:true”]
Our Power Grid is surprisingly vulnerable. There are about 2000 step up transformers/substations in the US. They are all built overseas and take 1-2 years to build in good circumstances. A coordinated attack on just 9 or 10 substations would take down the entire grid for years. The cascade effect would be disastrous.

What you pointed out in the section I just highlighted is exactly what makes this such an unbelievably critical issue. By the time we got even one of these transformers up and going again, it would be too late to make a difference.
We have no extras ready to go, and no plan to make that happen.