Whole Corn for SHTF Food Storage

5 Likes

lol@that guy…another money beggar…

4 Likes

you prefer the other white meat over feed corn?

3 Likes

You’ll eat your deer corn & like it , Mr.!! :rofl:

3 Likes

Stalin(? I think it was Stalin) decreed that any white Russians caught growing food would be shot. So they starved to death with grain bins full of feed corn for their pigs. They didn’t see it as food.

Native Americans would parch dry corn to make it palatable as a trail/hunting food when on the move. Click here

Like hardtack I never made it, I just know of it. It might turn out to be excellent buttons for the hardtack shoes. :smiley:

6 Likes

On a serious note…For those that DO store dried whole corn as a prep, what exactly do you make with it? I buy small bags and grind my own into cornmeal for cornbread, make polenta, grits and even made my own masa for homemade tortillas. I just wonder how much of those foods someone with 2-3 tons of dried corn think they are actually going to eat in an emergency. I get having preps. I have preps. I just don’t get having MASSIVE amounts of corn unless you have livestock.

5 Likes

a still?

image

11 Likes

Yeah, I guess during a collapse booze would certainly be a great barter item.

6 Likes

And fuel

8 Likes

Do you have neighbors with stomachs? You need to sleep sometime and you’ll need help. The same goes for any item stored, it’s for those who’ll help. Just have guns for yourself? How will your neighbors protect you when you sleep? If they have guns what will they use for ammo? You’re not just buying for yourself but for others. They might be family or neighbors. (read the last line in this post)

It can always be traded for things you don’t have.

It’s the very rare person who can survive all by himself with no interaction from others. Even Rambo, the person in the documentary of the same name, used things that others made. He wasn’t an island unto himself.

So what does one do with a ton of corn? It feeds the other people one will need for ones own survival. It also helps to have like minded folks to share the burden of supply. As we can’t survive on our own, neither can we feed everyone on our own either, or most of us can’t.

6 Likes

From my original reply

There are probably FAR better things to put away(salt for example). Corn, while cheap/abundant/long storing, is pretty limited in its use as human food or requires more prep/supplies to work in that regard than other staples. Corn by itself, in its whole kernel form, provides very little in the way of nutrients. It need to be processed for people to get anything meaningful out of it. Masa for tortillas requires soaking corn in a caustic bath, drying it again and then grinding for example. Cornbread needs eggs, milk and butter. The list goes on.

If you expect such long lasting turmoil that you feel the need to stock tons of dried corn you should certainly not expect to have electricity. It’s gonna be a $#!++Y day when you have to grind enough corn by hand to produce flour or meal to feed your entire family and neighbors. Rice and beans? Simple. Soak in water and then boil. But…

That brings up something else. How’s your water supply? Corn, rice, beans or wheat are all useless without potable water. Don’t give me the “I’m on a well plus I have a generator so I’m covered” bit either. If you’re on a well, how deep is it? Have you ever R&R’d a well? I have(dozens). Unless it is a shallow spring fed well it was probably dropped with a crane in 20’ or longer sections. Do you have the equipment/tools to pull that possibly >250’ deep well if the pump goes? Do you even have a spare pump?

About that generator…Do you have the parts and skills to fix it? I’m not just talking about a tuneup/carb rebuild but actually rebuild the engine or rewind the armature if necessary. Few generators on the market, outside those incredibly large trailered units often used by construction companies, are built for extended run times and high duty cycles. They are ALL maintenance hogs by the way. Generally they require being exercised at least monthly. When was the last time you actually fired yours up???

Having the space and skill to grow FRESH produce, possibly even raise a few chickens and goats for eggs/meat/dairy will go miles further than a ton of corn in your basement or a generator in the shed for ‘end of days’. There’s a family of 4 or 5 on YouTube that grow so much on 1/8 acre that they actually sell the surplus to local restaurants. Yes they are in CA so their growing season is longer, but for most areas one only needs a bit more space or ingenuity to produce equal amounts in less time. The difference is doing that requires skills where buying bags of corn only requires money.

Learn to grow your own food. Learn how to can or pickle it to last through the winter. Learn to raise and process small farm animals. Learn how to cure/dry/can those goods. Skills plus some proper simple tools trump stockpiling random ‘foodstuffs’ any day of the week, regardless of their low cost or shelf life. The alternative is you’ll be trading those 50# bags of corn for a few pounds of goat meat from the person that did or your bullets/guns to the guy that can actually fix your generator/well/grain mill.

8 Likes

and something missed in all this - better invest in cats if you wish to have a ton of corn - otherwise the beady eyed four legged vermin will deal with you faster than any two legged.

6 Likes

Oddly, my parents keep a bag of whole corn around for the deer in a couple of 5 gallon plastic buckets. The mice and voles leave it entirely alone but are more than happy to claw their way into the dog food bin. If one were storing dried corn long term the best bet might be sealed mylar bags in metal drums and leave a sacrificial bag of dog food nearby.

4 Likes

and if the dog food runs out they will eventually get the corn, animals are like humans they will go for what’s better and easiest first…

5 Likes

I’ve thought about a lot of this for a while. Some of us don’t have the time and energy to maintain livestock even if we have the place to do it. Storing seeds and Mason jars can REALLY help in the long run. For short term, I am picking up pickle buckets from “Popeyes”. They use the 5/6 gal with a sealing lid. I can store a short term supply of rice, beans, corn, pasta, salt, sesonings, powdered milk, sugar, instant coffee, SOAP, etc… What I need to study about is if I vacuum seal these things and put them in buckets, will they eventually mold or mildew? I’m picking up some of the buckets today. They’re free.

5 Likes

You don’t need to go ‘whole hog’, pun intended, with a self supporting homestead out of the gate. You can learn a lot about how to properly butcher animals and preserve the meat without raising the animals yourself. Learning can be started simply by buying whole chickens and butchering/canning the meat yourself or buying a full leg of cattle/lamb/pig to make your own sausage, bacon, canned stews and more.

Be sure to buy HEIRLOOM seeds. Many commercially available seeds are a one use deal and don’t produce fruits/veg with their own usable seeds. Just as important is you need to know how to use them now. You need to learn what does and doesn’t grow well in your area/climate/soil long before you try to implement them in an emergency. A small garden, 10x10 or even window boxes if you don’t have a yard, takes little time to maintain and will be an eye opener as to what you do and don’t actually know. Hearty root vegetables such as potatoes, onions or carrots are very low maintenance crops once you get the planting right. They also provide tons of ‘filler’ for those stews mentioned earlier. Fruits such as tomatoes(yes they are a fruit) can be grown on a balcony using one of those upside-down growers(you can make your own as well). Practice making and canning your own fresh pasta sauces with them. You’re going to want it if you put away pastas.

YES. Yes they will. You need to seal them with oxygen absorbers. Vacuum sealing alone will NOT remove the oxygen, which is your biggest enemy. Also, DO NOT use ‘foodsaver’ bags except for short term storage. Use proper Mylar food bags for anything long term. For salt or sugar vacuum sealing should be enough(though moisture will make it cake up) but rice/beans/powdered milk require oxygen removal. Powdered milk is actually best stored, and can be bought, in #10 cans. Bags and oxygen absorbers will work for powdered milk but cans are far more convenient for dividing and using it.

5 Likes

In 2012 I packed my first dry goods in mylar bags with oxygen obsorbers. I was nervous as I had never done it before. I sealed bags of spaghetti noodles, sugar, white bleached flour, pizza crust (I bought those small cheap boxes and opened them all up and put them all in one mylar bag), dry beans, rice, regular coffee, and many seasonings. I put these mylar bags (with oxygen obsorbers in them) in food grade buckets I got from the backery at Walmart and Kroger (they get their frostings and other deli and bakery items in these buckets).
This year I decided to check the status of everything as I was wanting to start putting stuff away again but wasn’t sure how the food from 2012 held up.
Everything was good except for one thing, the pizza crust. It didn’t have bugs or anything, but when I tried to cook a pizza using it, it failed miserably. Not sure why, but it didn’t rise at all nor cook properly. But everything else was great.
As far as the seasonings, I didn’t seal those in bags. I just put all the jars and canisters I bought from the store together with containers of salt, chili powder, baking powder and baking soda (the baking soda I put in a jar with an oxygen obsorber in it), etc. all down in one of the buckets and shut the bucket tight. Everything turned out great, but I think I’ll read up on seasonings and see if maybe I should do it a different way. But honestly, nothing was wrong with any of it.

Everything on my first run was cheap. Spaghetti noodles are cheap, rice, dry beans, flour etc. So I figured it was a good first experiment. Pretty sure the bags and the oxygen obsorbers were more expensive than the food that was in the bags.
I also have a chamber vacuum sealer. This I use for short term items usually, like jerky or meats for the freezer when I divide them into smaller quantities. I also vacuum seal just about anything going in my prep totes, inlcuding wash rags and well, pretty much what ever will fit in the bags. I have thousands of bags, and they didn’t cost me much, so I figure I’ll just keep things sealed and fresh, plus it squooshes things down which takes up less space. I have to admit, the chamber vacuum sealer is a little addictive. I find myself walking around the house looking for things to seal. And yes, I sealed some ammo too.
Found my receipt from back then. I can say the large bags were too large, but can be cut down. The 14x20 was a perfect size.

6 Likes

Good post :+1:

3 Likes

Thanks for all the good info. I wasn’t sure what a chamber vacuum sealer was so I looked it up. WOW! There are some really expensive ones out there and some not so much. Being a firm believer in you get what you pay for, do you have any suggestions about sealers? I know I could never talk my wife into spending a fortune for one.

4 Likes

And my wife has a question aboutg the pizza crusts. Were they the pre-made ones or the mix in a box like Jiffy? A side comment about them not rising is that the O2 aborbers probably killed the yeast.

4 Likes