WHY YOU SHOULDN'T SHOOT SMALL GROUPS 🤔

https://www.ammoland.com/2019/08/why-you-shouldnt-shoot-small-groups-defensive-pistol-training/#axzz5wie5v5WN

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Horse hockey… if you practice this way eventually you WILL get to the point that you can shoot fairly small groups with rapid fire. I do it all the time.

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We only shoot for tight groups to sight in our EDC’s
Then it’s mostly all reality based.

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There’s no reason not to practice both accuracy and being fast.
That is the goal, being quick and accurate.
Ignoring either one might be detrimental to your health.

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Better article than I thought it was going to be. I thought we were going to get into the point shooting nonsense again… he guy does make some valid points but I disagree with others

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I read it, it has some good points to it. :+1:

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Agree, but had me scratching my head also…

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I did think, well I don’t have to draw fast to miss. 2 more cups of coffee and it’s anybody’s guess where placements hit. :rofl:

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:joy::rofl: you might have to switch to decaf

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Clint Smith advises to “shoot them in the dick” which would be a small target if its @LonewolfMcQuade or @Belt-Fed

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Or a non existent target in your case @Joe-Bob
Ya fuken dickless wonder!

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Stop peepin in my windows ya pervert.

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Besides that naked pic you sent me in a PM was tough to see without a magnifier. I seen more meat on 10 cents worth of bacon.

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Stop derailing the thread guys.

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Years ago, not long after I first started carrying, a coworker kept telling me that I needed to forget about carefully aimed, slow-fire practice, and focus on rapid-fire on multiple targets. I had recently switched to carrying a pistol with a DAO trigger, after spending a fair amount of time getting to the point that I could shoot accurately (slow-fire) with that heavy trigger, and finally decided to try things his way.

The idea was to attempt two hits on each target, rapid-fire, then reload and attempt two additional hits on each target (number of targets determined by magazine capacity). This was during the silly federal ban on magazines over 10 rounds, so I set up 5 targets and started with the pistol holstered. The result was so pathetically embarrassing, that I started wondering if I should give up on carrying a gun (1 round on paper, out of 20 rounds fired).

With my self-esteem destroyed, I decided that I might as well not hold back, and moved on to removing any lingering shred of hope that I could accurately shoot rapid-fire with a handgun. I got out my 1911, which I had considerably more practice with (slow-fire), but had never quite gotten to the accuracy level that I had been hoping for. I was using 8 round mags for it, so only four targets this time. And… once again I found myself wondering just how did that happen. Out of two mags, I had one flyer, but the rest of the shots were on target with considerably better groups than when I had done the 50 round qualification for the carry permit.

Now that I had two completely unexpected results (one horribly worse than expected, and one much better than expected), I decided to try the Makarov that I had used during the qualification for the carry permit. After giving up on even trying to decide what to expect from the Makarov’s DA/SA trigger and tiny sights in this experiment, I was happy to see that the result was nearly identical to what I had done with the 1911 (though the mag change was considerably slower).

I put the pistol with the DAO trigger away, and eventually traded it off.

A person needs to practice both ways. Start off with slow, carefully aimed fire, to get the process burned into you. Then add rapid-fire practice into your routine. It can be an eye-opening experience.

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Yup… people either DONT practice or they practice under highly improbably circumstances.

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Good article.
I have a friend who is a firearms instructor, and this is some of the same training we work on together.
But we also practice shooting tiny groups as well.
Tiny groups show you where you are at with your fundamentals.
Reaction drills show you where you’re at with your “combat” skills.

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Good article. I sometimes practice with drawing and shooting as quickly as possible and usually I can hit a silhouette at 7 yards, but that’s about it. They’re definitely not hitting center mass.

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Different target shapes and sizes, induces a shooter to be mentally “in the game” or otherwise said that if a Bullseye target shooting exercise tends to focus on a distinctly smaller target, repetitively, then a constant changing of target wakes up the brain, or makes the shooter alert to changing targets…

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Changing the range is also a good idea. Put some targets at 5 yards, some targets at 25 yards (50 yards, if you want to test your ability with a pistol at longer ranges), and targets at varying ranges in between. Also vary them to the sides.

You can vary how you prioritize the targets - shoot closest first, then work out, shoot farthest first then work in, left to right, right to left, or work out some random method for prioritizing the targets (maybe a color code?).

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